Archive for November, 2009

Meet Marquis Daniels: Hockey Player

Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

WALTHAM  —  Marquis Daniels knows the tough reputation of hockey players. They are the types who get 20 stitches after taking a puck to the face and miss one shift and are back on the ice.

So, when he was spotted again on Tuesday with heavy tape around his left [non-shooting] wrist, he made an appropriate cross-sport reference.

“It’s okay,” Daniels said with a smile. “I’m hockey player. I’m alright.”

Somewhere, Cam Neely is smiling. Or in Daniels’ case, Mario Lemieux. He knows who No. 66 was and what he did for hockey.

But ask him how he injured the wrist and Daniels struggles to remember.

“I don’t even know,” Daniels said after Tuesday’s practice. “I just realized it after the Indiana game. I was like something doesn’t feel right. You’re going to get it hit out here. That’s why I keep tape on it, to keep it protected. I can’t skate. I’m not going to try. I’m from Florida, I don’t even like ice.”

“I actually don’t know the answer,” his coach Doc Rivers added. “He hurt it, I think, all the way back in preseason if I’m not mistaken. He does bandage it more in practice than in the games. But lately, he’s going to that more in the games.  I don’t think it’s anything where he needs surgery or anything like that. But it must be bothering him some or he wouldn’t be wearing it.”

Daniels said he’s not worried that the wrist could limit his offensive punch.

“I shoot layups anyway so I’m okay,” he said, all the while smiling. “It’s nothing. I’m okay. I can play, I can run. I still have my legs. I can move. I’m alright.”

Daniels, who is averaging 6.3 points in 13 games, said it won’t keep him from fulfilling his role as one of the first players off the bench when the team takes on Philadelphia on Wednesday night at TD Garden.

C’s want to see improvement starting now

Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

WALTHAM — One of the most consistent players on the Celtics so far says coach Doc Rivers wants to see more consistency as a team.

“I know Doc said starting from the last game that we want to try to make a run all the way up until our Christmas game,” Kendrick Perkins said.

Perkins had 16 points and 13 rebounds on Sunday in New York. He is second on the team in rebounding behind Kevin Garnett and is averaging 10.5 points a game.

“We want to be on the right track. I know guys are locked in and focused right now. We’ve just got to stick together. It’s not always going to be great times through the season all the time so we just have to stick together.”

The Celtics improved to 10-4 by surviving an overtime scare on Sunday in New York to beat the Knicks, 107-105, on Garnett’s jumper at the buzzer. They play Philadelphia on Wednesday night at TD Garden.

Perkins: Inside the mind of a shot-blocker

Monday, November 23rd, 2009

Kendrick Perkins leads the Celtics in blocked shots this season and also is one of the top swatters in the NBA. His 29 blocks through 14 games ranks him seventh overall in the league in blocks per game (2.07) and blocks per 48 minutes (3.73). He ranks third in total blocks among all NBA centers and second in the Eastern Conference.

Perkins gave WEEI.com a glimpse into the mind of a shot-blocker:

Good block, bad block: ‘€œA good block is when you can block a shot and keep it in play. A block, rebound, keep it in play where you get the possession. A bad block is when you block it and block it out of bounds and you’ve got to play defense all over again.’€

Timing is everything: ‘€œTiming, you’ve got to read. I think you’ve got to read, see what’s going on. Sometimes you’ve got to judge whether or not you can actually block the shot. Is it worth trying to go and block it? So it’s all timing and decision making.’€

Judgment call: ‘€œWell, you can tell if a guy’s out of position as far as just how he goes up, if he’s kind of capable of making the shot. If a guy goes up out of control, you kind of want to fall back and just wait for a rebound.’€

Making the move: ‘€œWhen it leaves his hands, then you jump up.’€

Perkins has used his judgment to make cautious decisions on defense. He leads all Eastern Conference centers in blocks per personal foul (.74). Perkins shows no signs of letting up this season, either. He is averaging a season-best 2.5 blocks per game on zero days’ rest.


Celts’ struggles, by the numbers

Monday, November 23rd, 2009

After 14 games, the Celtics are 10-4, comfortably in first place in their division and just one game behind the league leaders (Atlanta, Orlando and Phoenix, who all beat the Celtics in the last 10 days). The Celtics also have the NBA’s best point differential at +8.8, and point differential is a more reliable indicator than record.

Despite all that, something seems wrong with the Celtics, who needed overtime to get past a dreadful Knicks team and have lost three of their last five, with all three losses coming against the aforementioned teams with better records. So, what gives?

First, their record and point differential are skewed from the first five games of the season, when the C’s ran roughshod over the league and people started seriously considering 72 wins. The Celtics won the next game, 92-90, against Minnesota, but that’s when their play started to slip.

FIRST FIVE

Record: 5-0

Point differential: +21.6

Points for: 101.4

Points against: 79.8

NEXT NINE

Record: 5-4

Point differential: +1.7

Point for: 96.7

Points against: 95

By far the biggest slip in terms of individual offensive numbers belongs to Rasheed Wallace, who made 15 of his first 33 3-point attempts through the first five games and has been 7-for-48 from beyond the arc ever since. Wallace has acknowledged that he’s in a slump, but the general consensus is that he is taking good shots and they’re just not falling for him. That happens. On the positive side, it has not affected Wallace’s defense.

Ray Allen has been a similar 3-point shooting slump, although not nearly as pronounced. Through five games, Allen was 9-for-21. He is 7-for-29 in the last nine. Despite shooting 32 percent from 3-point range, Allen has continued to be a productive offensive player by shooting 57 percent on his 2-point shots (60-for-106).

Digging a little bit deeper, 82games.com has Allen as the Celtics’ most productive player in terms of on-court plus/minus with Wallace second, so while their shooting slumps may account for the Celtics’ drop offensively, the real issue is a defense that went from giving up less than 80 points a night (a number that is skewed by holding Charlotte to 59 points) to one that is surrendering 95.

After we plow through the numbers on 82games.com, a few things stand out.

The C’s defense on jump shots is worse than last year (.433, 48.1 points per game vs. .417, 43.4 points per game) and they are also struggling defending teams at the end of the shot clock compared to last season (.491 compared to .447). This brings up something Doc Rivers said last week:

“Some of our defensive sets have been very good, and then with five seconds left on the clock the guy dribbling the ball gets all the way to the basket and that’€™s not just the guy guarding the ball.”

That speaks to effort, fatigue or just plain understanding the defensive system. It’s probably safe to rule out effort with this group, and “understanding the system” should work itself out in time, but it does explain Rivers saying that the team was “making stuff up” after the Orlando loss. That leaves fatigue, and it’s worth noting that the Celtics’ biggest wins during this stretch ‘€” Utah and Golden State ‘€” came after multiple days off.

That, in a nutshell, is what makes people wary about the Celtics come playoff time. The good news is that we are a long way from April, and most teams would love to struggle out of the gate at 10-4. To be sure, there are other issues, particularly a lack of offensive rebounding and fewer trips to the free throw line, but age will continue to be the dominant theme from here on out.

Celtics Community Roundup

Monday, November 23rd, 2009

The Celtics stay involved in the community year-round and are beginning to gear up for the holiday season:

  • On Monday, November 23 Tony Allen will take 15 students from Timilty Middle School grocery shopping and teach them about budgeting their money. Each student will receive $100 to purchase a Thanksgiving meal for their family at Whole Foods in Boston, where Allen will help them select food and keep track of their choices with a budget sheet. All of the students come from families in need and were chosen for their academic achievements.
  • As part of his Ray of Hope Foundation, Ray Allen will provide 275 families with Thanksgiving meals on Tuesday, November 24 at the Shelburne Community Center in Roxbury. These families were pre-selected by the Boston Center for Youth and Families. The non-cooked meals will include a turkey, gravy, stuffing, cranberry sauce, potatoes, salad, green beans, dinner rolls, pumpkin pie, and beverages. Costco Wholesale, Vitamin Water, and American Express will also help serve the meals.
  • The Celtics Women’s Group will continue collecting new shoes, boots, and socks for Cradles to Crayons on Wednesday, November 25 prior to the Celtics home game against the 76ers. Collection areas will be set up at the main turnstiles of the TD Garden from 5:00pm ‘€“ 7:30pm.
  • During the Friday, November 27 game against the Raptors, the Celtics and Simon Malls will present the ‘€œTake a Shot’€ promotion. Fans can win prizes ranging from Celtics tickets to $700 in Simon Boston Celtics Giftcards. Click here for locations to enter and additional ‘€œTake a Shot’€ promotional dates during the season.

Fast break: Celtics-Knicks

Sunday, November 22nd, 2009

Depending on your point of view, the Celtics 107-105 victory over the Knicks in overtime Sunday at Madison Square Garden was either a gritty gut-check, or a further sign that things are not right with the C’s.

Kevin Garnett hit the winning shot, but was 4-for-15 for the game. Ray Allen made a huge 3-pointer late in regulation, but was 3-for-13. Rasheed Wallace continued his slump missing all six shots. And on the defensive end, the Celtics held the Knicks to 43 percent shooting, but allowed Al Harrington to drop 30 points on them off the bench, which contributed to the C’s blowing a 14-point lead in the second half.

Either way, it’s a win the Celtics will take after losing three of their last four.

Player of the game: Paul Pierce. The Celtics captain had been content to play distributor at times this season, but with the memory of so many slow starts in his head, Pierce elected to take over early and often. He scored 17 of his 33 points in the first half and lived at the free throw line, all while helping handle some of the point guard duties. There are lot of things that are “off” with the Celtics right now, but Pierce is not one of them.

Turning point: There were so many ebbs and flows that it’s hard to pick one moment as the turning point, but as big shots go it was hard to top Allen’s corner 3-pointer in transition that gave the Celtics a 96-94 lead late in regulation. New York came back to tie the game on a couple of occasions, but never regained the lead.

* It’s still too early to judge Garnett on his comeback, but the judgments will start to come after yet another lackluster performance, despite his game-winning shot. Doc Rivers has acknowledged that Garnett is still a work in progress but he continues to insist that KG is 100 percent healthy.

* Kendrick Perkins played the role of unsung hero with 16 points and 13 rebounds in what might have been his best game of the season. He also refused to get into anything extra with Eddy Curry who has returned to the Knicks a far more feisty player than when they banished him. Curry was sent to the bench, and assessed a flagrant foul, after whacking Rajon Rondo in the back of the head. That came after Perkins stymied him on the block.

* Where was Nate Robinson down the stretch? Knicks coach Mike D’Antoni did the Celtics a favor by keeping Robinson on the bench in favor of Chris Duhon, who is neither a good shooter nor a good creator with the ball in his hands.

Rondo helping Hudson improve defense

Saturday, November 21st, 2009

WALTHAM ‘€“ With the Celtics departing for New York in less than an hour, it was nearly impossible to pull Rajon Rondo and Lester Hudson off the court.

The two point guards were in the midst of an intense post-practice drill and neither wanted to stop. Rondo drove, pulled up for shots, and tried to shake Hudson on the way to the basket. Hudson buckled down and tried to stay one step ahead of him.

‘€œI just play defense and he’s on offense the whole time,’€ Hudson explained.

The drill, while competitive, was friendly in nature — ‘€œMe and Lester are pretty close. I like Les,’€ said Rondo. They decided some extra practice time would help Hudson improve on defense and Rondo was happy to help him out.

‘€œ[I’ve learned] you’ve got to be ready,’€ said Hudson. ‘€œThere are multiple pick-and-rolls in practice. Just he’s very quick so he’s going to help me out guarding quicker guards in the NBA, so hopefully I can get my defense right.’€

Rondo participated in similar drills as a rookie against Sebastian Telfair and Delonte West and knows the benefits of additional time on the court. It is especially valuable for Hudson, who has clocked just 37 minutes so far in his first season.

‘€œHe can play D, he’s long, he’s athletic, he’s quick,’€ Rondo said of Hudson. ‘€œHe’s going to be a great player in the league one day. He’s young, he’s just trying to learn the way and try to find his way on the team.’€

Hudson also learned about Rondo’s game as well. Rondo is shooting 55.9% from the field this season, the second best percentage among all guards behind Chris Paul, but his offense has been criticized in the past.

‘€œHe can shoot better than I thought he could. He’s very quick, so it helps me on my defense. I’m trying to get my defense up,’€ Hudson said. ‘€œHe can shoot from the three. In one-on-ones he’s been hitting, so I think he can shoot it. He just has to shoot the ball.’€

Neither player keeps score in this drill. It just comes down to shots and stops.

Said Hudson, ‘€œWe just go til we say we’re done.’€