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Claude Julien: Given injuries, ‘it almost takes a perfect game’ to beat good teams like Canadiens 11.23.14 at 12:10 am ET
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The Bruins are trying not to use their injuries as an excuse. But they’re also not naive enough to say they’re the same team with Zdeno Chara, David Krejci, Brad Marchand, Chris Kelly and Adam McQuaid all out of the lineup.

Claude Julien acknowledged as much Saturday night after a 2-0 loss to the Canadiens, a game in which the Bruins actually played fairly well, especially considering that it was the second night of a back-to-back. They made a couple mistakes, though, and they couldn’t finish their opportunities against Carey Price.

“I thought we played hard. We competed. We were smart. We didn’t give them much,” Julien said. “It’s unfortunate, but this is where we realize that right now when you play a team that’s healthy and that’s going extremely well, it almost takes a perfect game.”

So far the Bruins have gone 9-5-0 without Chara, including the game in which he got hurt (he went down midway through the first period). That’s obviously pretty good — probably even better than expected — but it’s also come against a pretty soft schedule. Only six of those games were against teams currently in playoff position, and the B’s have gone 2-4-0 in those games.

The schedule doesn’t stay easy, though. Of the Bruins’ next 10 games, seven are against teams currently in playoff position, and there’s also a West Coast road trip in there.

The Bruins hope to start getting some guys back, and they hope to do it without losing anyone else. So far this season, it seems like every time someone returns to the lineup, someone else goes down. While the Bruins are excited for all the young guys who are getting a taste of the NHL, they also admit that it can be a bit of a challenge to stay upbeat seeing one injury after another.

“It’s tough,” Torey Krug said. “You don’t want to see your buddies go through it. Guys go down and miss some time. It’s almost like ‘here we go again, another guy goes down,’ but we can’t focus on that because there’s hockey games to be won, and we just have to keep moving forward.”

In reality, the Bruins don’t have too much to worry about unless they start sliding out of the playoff race. We’ve seen plenty of lower seeds go on deep playoff runs over the years, and a healthy Bruins team could certainly do the same. Given how bad most of the teams behind them are, it doesn’t seem likely that they drop out of the race.

That doesn’t mean there won’t be frustrating nights for fans and players alike, though. With so many top players out, the Bruins simply aren’t a top team right now, meaning there will probably be more nights like Saturday when an admirable effort just isn’t enough.

Milan Lucic calls 1-punch knockdown from Blue Jackets’ Dalton Prout ‘gutless’ 11.22.14 at 10:48 pm ET
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It’s not often that anyone around the Bruins talks about a non-Montreal game after a Montreal game, but that was the case Saturday night when Milan Lucic was asked about the end of Friday night’s game in Columbus.

As overtime came to a close Friday night, Lucic got into a shoving match with Blue Jackets defenseman Dalton Prout after Prout slashed Lucic’s stick out of his hands. Lucic gave Prout a hard shove to the back of the head at one point, and the shoving match eventually escalated to the point where Prout dropped his gloves, anticipating a fight.

Lucic, however, did not drop his gloves. Prout decided to throw a punch anyway and knocked Lucic down with a hard right to the mouth that clearly caught Lucic off guard. Lucic expressed his displeasure with Proust when he was asked about the incident Saturday night.

“I didn’t like it,” Lucic said. “The good thing is we get to play them two more times. … It’s the end of the game. I let him know I wasn’t going to fight him, so I wasn’t prepared and let my guard down. That’s what happens sometimes when you let your guard down. I’ve been in over 100 fights and I never took a shot like that. Like I said, we get two more opportunities to play the Blue Jackets, and I’ll be ready.

“There’s many times that I could’ve done the exact same thing and I held off because a guy’s refusing to drop his gloves. I find it to be gutless. That’s my thoughts on it.”

Read More: dalton prout, Milan Lucic,
Matt Bartkowski’s mostly good return to lineup highlights small margin for error 11.15.14 at 5:54 pm ET
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Matt Bartkowski

Matt Bartkowski

Matt Bartkowski made one mistake that could have been costly. Early in the second period, with the Bruins leading Carolina 2-1, Bartkowski turned the puck over to Chris Terry just inside his own blue line. Terry led a quick 2-on-1 and tried to center for Jeff Skinner, who wound up redirecting an aerial pass over the net.

Aside from that one play, Bartkowski’s return to the lineup following seven straight healthy scratches was a good one. He was effective on breakouts. He got involved in the offensive zone and wound up with four shots on goal, tied for the team lead in the game. He was physical, most notably landing a big, clean hit on Patrick Dwyer midway through the second. His plus-3 Corsi was the best among Bruins defensemen in the game.

“I think I did alright for how much time I sat out,” Bartkowski said. “I was moving. I didn’t really give them too much, a few chances, but other than that it went pretty well.”

In many ways, Saturday’s game was a good representation of Bartkowski as a whole. There has always been quite a bit to like about Bartkowski’s game, namely his skating, puck movement in transition and ability to win battles down low.

Let’s not forget that Bartkowski was a top-four defenseman for a stretch during the 2013 playoffs and then for most of last season, and that he was at least serviceable in that role. There’s a reason he got those minutes over other options — because he was better-equipped to handle them.

But there have always been those mistakes, too. They started to reach a breaking point in last year’s playoffs, when he wound up being a healthy scratch in favor of Andrej Meszaros four times in 12 games. Then they continued into this season, and Bartkowski found himself watching from the press box as less experienced players like Joe Morrow, Zach Trotman and David Warsofsky were given a look.

Bartkowski said he didn’t work on any one thing in particular while he was out of the lineup and instead just tried to work hard and stay positive.

“Just worked hard in practice, worked hard on the bike, in the weight room,” Bartkowski said. “That’s about it. … Just playing hockey, that’s all it is. And just focused on staying in game shape.”

Bartkowski playing well can help the Bruins’ back end more than Morrow or Trotman. He could even get back into the top four (for what it’s worth, he was sixth among Bruins defensemen in ice time on Saturday). But he needs to cut down on the mistakes. An occasional mistake is understandable, but if they happen every night, Claude Julien may be forced to bench him again.

Even a mistake like Saturday’s — just one in an otherwise good game — is pushing it. What if the Hurricanes had converted on that 2-on-1 and tied the game? The rest of Bartkowski’s good game would have been completely forgotten and that mistake would have been the story of the game if the Bruins went on to drop a point or two.

It’s a thin line for Bartkowski right now, and that what-if scenario from Saturday highlights just how thin it is.

Read More: Matt Bartkowski,
Young defensemen Joe Morrow, Zach Trotman, David Warsofsky aim to make most of opportunity 11.01.14 at 11:51 pm ET
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David Warsofsky is one of the young Bruins defensemen getting a shot thanks to injuries. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

David Warsofsky is one of the young Bruins defensemen getting a shot thanks to injuries. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

The Bruins’ defense could easily be a complete disaster right now. With Zdeno Chara, Torey Krug and Kevan Miller all injured and Matt Bartkowski struggling mightily, disaster might have even been the expectation.

But thanks to the way Joe Morrow, Zach Trotman and David Warsofsky have played the last two games, the Bruins’€™ defense has not been a disaster. Warsofsky made one glaring mistake Thursday night against Buffalo on a bad pinch that led to an odd-man rush and a goal at the other end, but other than that, the trio of young defensemen (Trotman and Warsofsky are 24; Morrow is 21) have played mistake-free hockey, which is all anyone can realistically ask for given the situation.

“They’ve been really good,”€ Dougie Hamilton said. “I think it just shows how deep our organization is. You could see that in the preseason and training camp and everything. They can all play, so it shows, I guess, how deep we are as an organization. They’€™ve played really well, so it’€™s nice to have that.”

All three have played 15 or more minutes in each of the last two games. Warsofsky, who has the most NHL experience in the group with eight career games, has led the way at 18:09 on Thursday and 19:16 in Saturday’€™s 4-2 win over the Senators. Trotman, now up to six career NHL games, played a career-high 17:51 on Saturday. Morrow, a former first-round pick, played 16:05 Saturday after logging 17:51 in his NHL debut on Thursday.

Warsofsky and Trotman both saw significant power-play time Saturday, with Warsofsky’€™s 3:24 on the man advantage leading all Bruins. All three have gotten a taste of killing penalties as well.

One thing Warsofsky, Trotman and Morrow can all do well is break the puck out, either with their skating or their passing. They all still have work to do when it comes to playing without the puck, but their decision-making with the puck has been a noticeable strength so far.

“I think they’€™ve been very poised with the puck, skating the puck very well, and just playing consistent hockey,”€ Dennis Seidenberg said. “It’s nice to see that. We always talk about depth, and hopefully we can build on that and put some consistency together.”

It’€™s worth noting that the two games in which all three have played haven’€™t exactly been against the toughest competition. The Sabres are a contender for the first overall pick, and even though it took overtime for the Bruins to beat them, it was a game the B’€™s dominated from a possession standpoint. The Senators have a decent record (5-3-2), but they’re also not a very good possession team.

Still, the fact that Warsofsky, Trotman and Morrow have done what’€™s been asked of them is encouraging. These last two games should give them some confidence moving forward, and the Bruins will need them to continue their solid play while they wait for Chara, Krug and Miller to return.

“I think we’€™re all just taking advantage of it,”€ Warsofsky said. “€œWe’€™re all around the same age and it’€™s all of our first handful of games, so we’€™re all kind of in the same boat. We’€™re having fun with it and trying to play our games every night like we do in Providence and translate that up here. I think so far everyone’€™s done a good job.”

How Bruins overcame uncharacteristically bad nights from Patrice Bergeron, Zdeno Chara 10.21.14 at 11:51 pm ET
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Gregory Campbell was one of many Bruins who came up big Tuesday night. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Gregory Campbell was one of many Bruins who came up big Tuesday night. (Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Usually the Patrice Bergeron line and Zdeno Chara-Dougie Hamilton pairing are the Bruins’€™ constants. They’€™re the guys who are going to create offensive-zone possessions and not make mistakes.

That wasn’€™t the case on Tuesday. Bergeron was on the ice for all three of the Sharks’€™ goals, linemates Brad Marchand and Reilly Smith joined him for two of them (it is worth noting that Marchand had a nice power-play goal), and Chara was on the ice for two of them as well. Those four and Hamilton were the only Bruins who finished with Corsi-for percentages under 50 percent, meaning they were the only Bruins who were on the ice for more 5-on-5 shot attempts against than shot attempts for.

That would seemingly be a recipe for disaster for the Bruins, especially when you consider that outside of the Carl Soderberg line, the rest of the team had been one giant question mark to this point in the season. David Krejci had looked good since his return, but linemate Milan Lucic was off to a slow start and he still didn’€™t have a set-in-stone right wing. The fourth line had featured several different combinations, and none of them had really done much. And the second and third defense pairings had been inconsistent at best, with Kevan Miller’€™s injury raising even more questions on the back end.

At least for one night, those questions turned into answers. Lucic, Krejci and rookie right wing Seth Griffith factored into four of the Bruins’€™ five goals, with Lucic notching three assists and Griffith scoring his first NHL goal. Two of the goals they were on the ice for — Griffith’€™s and Torey Krug’€™s — came as the direct result of getting bodies to the net. Krejci set a great screen on Krug’€™s, and then Lucic created some net-front havoc that freed up Griffith on his goal.

“I think it definitely was the best game that we’€™ve played so far this season,” Lucic said. “You saw we were hungry in the O-zone and hungry getting pucks to the net. We made some smart decisions in some important areas and it just seems like things are starting to head in the right direction.”

The fourth line of Daniel Paille, Gregory Campbell and Simon Gagne was a positive possession line that even created some chances against the Sharks’€™ top two lines. They scored what proved to be the game-winner midway through the third when Paille won the puck along the boards and threw a shot on net that Campbell tipped in for his first goal of the season.

Campbell and Paille were also big on the penalty kill, especially late in the game when Bergeron went to the box for a four-minute double minor. Until Krejci’€™s empty-netter to seal the win, Campbell had the biggest play on that kill when he blocked a Joe Thornton shot that came off a Chara turnover.

“We’€™ve got to be a responsible, reliable line, and Claude [Julien] has to trust us to put us in those situations,” Campbell said. “With hard work comes trust, and if we’€™re playing our game and we’€™re in on the forecheck and creating chances and bringing energy to the lineup, then he usually has confidence in us.”

As for the bottom two defense pairings, the only glaring error was a bad miscommunication between Krug and Dennis Seidenberg that led to a goal, but as Julien pointed out after the game, Bergeron’€™s line was just as much at fault, as Smith had failed to clear the zone and Bergeron and Marchand had gotten caught up ice.

Outside of that, the Seidenberg-Krug and Matt Bartkowski-Adam McQuaid pairings played well. Krug’€™s goal and two assists obviously stand out, but let’€™s not overlook the fact that Seidenberg had seven shots on goal and 12 shot attempts, and that he and Krug had Corsi-for percentages of 63 and 62 percent, respectively. McQuaid and Bartkowski weren’€™t far behind at 61 and 57 percent, respectively, and McQuaid was also big on that final penalty kill.

Obviously this is just one game. No one should think that all of the Bruins’€™ question marks are gone and that everyone’€™s going to be great from here on. But on a night when the Bruins’€™ best players were uncharacteristically unreliable, it was encouraging to see everyone else step up and show that they can lead the way, too.

Read More: David Krejci, Dennis Seidenberg, Gregory Campbell, Milan Lucic
Video: Tuukka Rask plays drums for Buffalo band 10.20.14 at 3:57 pm ET
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We’ve seen a video game version of Brad Marchand play guitar, and now we get to see real life Tuukka Rask play drums.

According to the Buffalo News, Rask and a few teammates went to a show at the Allentown music venue in Buffalo on Friday night while they were in town for Saturday night’s game against the Sabres, a 4-0 Bruins win.

Rask asked local band The Mustn’ts if he could play drums for a song, and they let him sit in for a cover of Phish’s “Back on the Train.”

Here’s video of the performance:

Read More: Tuukka Rask,
Kevan Miller out indefinitely with dislocated shoulder 10.20.14 at 3:12 pm ET
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Kevan Miller

Kevan Miller

Bruins defenseman Kevan Miller is out indefinitely with a dislocated right shoulder, general manager Peter Chiarelli announced Monday. Miller suffered the injury in a fight with Buffalo’s Nicolas Deslaurier on Saturday night.

Miller had played in six of seven games for the Bruins, posting zero points and a plus-4 rating. He also has a plus-10.48 Corsi per 60 minutes and plus-0.2 CorsiRel, according to behindthenet.ca.

In Miller’s absence, Matt Bartkowski is likely to see more playing time.

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