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Charles Barkley, Kenny Smith grateful to be in Bill Russell’s inner circle 11.04.13 at 1:37 pm ET
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The city of Boston and the Celtics honored Bill Russell this past Friday, unveiling a 6-foot, 10-inch, 600-pound bronze statue of the 11-time NBA champion. Though the man has more championship rings than fingers, the ceremony detailed Russell’€™s work beyond basketball. For those in Russell’€™s inner circle — including Charles Barkley and Kenny “The Jet” Smith — the discussion was focused on Russell’€™s impact on society.

‘€œMost of us are too young to have seen him play,’€ said Barkley. ‘€œBut for guys like myself who got a chance to be around him, you see what a remarkable person he is. We know him more a man than a player.’€

Barkley and Smith, who are teammates on TNT’€™s extraordinarily popular “Inside the NBA,” both consider themselves very fortunate to be friends with the legendary Russell.

‘€œHe don’€™t talk to many people,’€ said Barkley. ‘€œSo if you get on the list, it’€™s pretty cool.’€

Smith was drafted by the Kings in 1987 and played a half-season for Russell, who was in his final stint as a head coach.

‘€œI was his first-ever draft pick,’€ said Smith. ‘€œI was overwhelmed meeting him. I didn’€™t know what to say, I didn’€™t know whether to call him ‘€˜Coach Russell,’€™ ‘€˜Bill,’€™ or ‘€˜Mr. Russell,’€™ and then my assistant coach was Willis Reed. I was in heaven. He taught me what teamwork was all about, regardless of winning and losing.’€

Smith, who emceed the ceremony, did not concentrate on Russell’€™s blocked shots or rebounds. He looks at him as a whole man, one who inspired people around the world and broke racial barriers. Smith thinks of the man who served as his mentor.

Russell’€™s greatest strength, in Smith’€™s words, is ‘€œhis ability to take a basketball moment and relate it to a lifetime experience. Something that my teammates always thought was going to be a punishment for me — sitting next to coach Russell on the team bus — actually turned out to be the best moment of my life.’€

Barkley laughed when recalling the story of Russell making Smith sit next to him on one of the Kings’ long bus rides. ‘€œKenny said, ‘€˜Why’€™ve I got to sit beside you?’€™ And Bill said, ‘€˜Because that guy’€™s a loser, that guy’€™s a loser, that guy’€™s a loser, and I don’€™t want you sitting with them.’€™ ‘€

Said Smith: ‘€œI sat next to him, on a bus ride or a plane ride, four hours a day. And if I went to sleep, he’€™d nudge me and go, ‘€˜Sleep nights, young fella. Listen to what I’€™m saying.’€™ And I listened to all those stories. It’€™s a great feeling to know I was part of that. Not being Satch Sanders or Tommy Heinsohn or any other great players who played with him, I feel like I’€™m one of those.’€

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Read More: Bill Russell, Charles Barkley, Kenny Smith,
Avery Johnson: ‘Rebuilding was the right move’ for Celtics 10.23.13 at 4:10 pm ET
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While New England is concentrating on the World Series, Avery Johnson will be focused only on Wednesday night’€™s preseason game between the Nets and the Celtics at TD Garden.

Johnson, who coached the Nets for 2½ seasons and was dismissed shortly after the Celtics trounced Brooklyn last Christmas, will be adding a very distinct voice to the ESPN airwaves this season, sharing his insight every Wednesday on “NBA Countdown.”

In a one-on-one interview with WEEI.com, Johnson shared his thoughts on the state of the Celtics, as well as the Nets’ decision to go all-in.

‘€œThis is a totally different year for the Celtics,’€ Johnson said. ‘€œA lot of the pieces that were there last year, those guys are pretty much in the twilight and near the end of their careers. They still had a lot of great basketball in them and can carry a team during the regular season, but that was an aging team.’€

Johnson, known as the ‘€œLittle General’€ during his playing career, believes the Celtics were never the same after Ray Allen‘€™s departure to Miami as a free agent last offseason.

‘€œThe loss of Ray Allen was too much,’€ Johnson said. ‘€œThey never really were able to fill his shoes in terms of the great work he did on the court for the Celtics over the years during their championship runs.’€

Similar to the beginning of his run with the Nets, a team that only won 24 games in 2011, Johnson sees a team in Boston with an uncertain future.

‘€œThis was a team that needed to change,’€ Johnson said. ‘€œObviously we didn’€™t know the change would occur with Doc Rivers not being a part of it, but everything’€™s changed. Now the Celtics have a lot of pieces they’€™re still trying to figure out. They’€™re still working on how they’€™re going to play defensively and offensively, and where they’€™re going, not only now, but in the future.’€

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Read More: Avery Johnson, Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce, Ray Allen
Back in Boston for ABCD charity event, Doc Rivers laments departure of Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce from Celtics 09.12.13 at 1:06 pm ET
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Doc Rivers returned to TD Garden on Wednesday night. The former coach of the Celtics served as a co-chair of the Action for Boston Community Development’s Hoop Dreams charity event and spent the evening shaking hands, signing autographs and sharing stories about his time in Boston.

“It’s tough to leave the Celtics because it’s the Celtics,” Rivers said. “It was the best nine years of basketball that I’ve ever been a part of, but I also fell in love with the city. And, for me, the hardest part is leaving the city. I’ve met friends that have changed my life here, and they’ll always be my friends.”

Sitting a few rows behind the Celtics bench, Rivers shared some insight on his tenure with the Celtics.

Kevin Garnett served as a focal point of the discussion. Rivers lamented the fact that KG never let the city see his vivacious side.

“Fans never got to see Kevin’s personality,” Rivers said. “I wish the city got to know Kevin more. He’s the single best athlete that I’ve ever been around as far as being a team guy. He’s as ‘team’ of a star as I’ve ever seen. A lot of stars are stars, but he’s unselfish, to a fault at times, but every coach should be able to coach Kevin Garnett just to see what a true team player should be.”

Rivers agreed that Garnett is an atypical NBA superstar, as he is a pass-first player who relishes his role as a teammate.

“He did a lot of good things that people don’t know,” Rivers said. “When rookies came in, he would bring them up to my office. He’d sit them down, and then he would bring his tailor in and say, ‘If you want to be a pro, you’ve got to dress like a pro.’ And he would buy each rookie two suits, and he did it every year. To me, that says a lot about Kevin Garnett as a teammate.”

Rivers also admitted that Garnett has an interesting use of the English language.

“The word that starts with ‘f’? He thought it was a noun, verb and an adjective,” Rivers said.

Celtics fans may never have the opportunity to see Garnett reveal his personality, but he delighted the city with his Hall of Fame play for six seasons.

“He’s full of life and a great guy in the locker room,” Rivers said. “He’s so unselfish, I think he would have scored another 10,000 points if he wanted. He’s the only player I’ve ever yelled at for not shooting. He always felt like if he took three or four shots in a row, that was too many. He needed to share the ball.”

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Read More: ABCD, Bob Ryan, Chris Paul, Doc Rivers
Brian Scalabrine optimistic about Celtics as he leaves Boston for Golden State 07.17.13 at 12:18 pm ET
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Brian Scalabrine is in the midst of a very productive offseason.

The 35-year-old native of Long Beach, Calif., is returning closer to home after joining Mark Jackson‘€™s coaching staff with the Warriors. Scalabrine also is working as a spokesperson with 2 Gingers Irish Whiskey, and he served up the popular ‘€œBig Ginger’€ cocktail behind the bar to excited patrons for three hours at Granary Tavern on Tuesday night in Boston.

‘€œScal’€ also sat down for a one-on-one interview with WEEI.com, and the former Celtic and Comcast SportsNet broadcaster shared his insight on topics ranging from the Celtics‘€™ championship in 2008, the bitter loss to the Lakers in 2010, and the work Danny Ainge has performed this summer. Scalabrine also quieted any speculation that he was in the running to replace Doc Rivers as coach in Boston.

“If four people would have passed on the Celtics, then I would have been interviewed to be the coach of the Celtics,” Scalabrine said. “But there’€™s no way four people were going to pass on that.”

Scalabrine was eager to share how greatly he evolved as a basketball player during his time with the Celtics.

“You have to look around at what you have,” he said. “That year [in 2007-08], we had Kevin Garnett directly from Minnesota coming in and changing the culture of our organization. He made sure guys were ready and focused. We could have fun in the locker room and joke around, but when it came to game time or practice, or the weight room or your individual time, it was time to lock in and get serious. Later on, on the bus or the plane, that’€™s when we could joke around. At the end of the day, we were about winning. We were about being successful.”

Winning a championship on a team driven by the likes of Garnett, Paul Pierce and Ray Allen helped Scalabrine perfect his own philosophy on the game of basketball.

“I’€™m about having success in life, but also having fun. There’€™s a misconception that I joke around and I’€™m not serious about the game of basketball. I’€™m ultra-serious about the game. I like the challenge of working with young guys, making them better, and getting them ready for a championship-caliber type of team. It’€™s not about getting better so you can be mediocre. I’€™m about getting you better so we can win a championship. That’€™s my focus.”

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Read More: Brian Scalabrine, Danny Ainge, Doc Rivers, Kevin Garnett
Kevin Garnett’s future determines Celtics’ ability to be competitive next few seasons 05.10.13 at 10:27 am ET
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If next season’€™s Celtics team does not start Kevin Garnett at power forward, prepare for a long, dark stretch. Without KG patrolling the middle in green and white, feel free to reintroduce yourself to the lottery, long losing streaks and the empty promise of rebuilding.

While you miss the scowls, intensity and blocked shots after the whistle, remember that the decline of the Celtics is more complex than the team simply aging. The major problem is the Celtics actually ask Garnett to do more now than they did during the NBA finals run in 2010. Despite his age (37 on May 19) and contract (2 years, $24.3 million), Garnett still is a premier power forward and a critical piece for a team chasing a championship.

‘€œBack in Minnesota, Kevin used to say, ‘€˜I want to live beyond my contract,’€™ ‘€ new Timberwolves president (and former coach) Flip Saunders told WEEI.com. ‘€œThat meant whatever he was getting paid, whenever someone would see him in a game or in a practice, he wanted to live up to that contract and then play beyond that.’€

Garnett has done exactly that in his six seasons in Boston. His playoff averages (35 minutes, 12.7 points, 13.7 rebounds, his highest playoff average since 2004) against the Knicks also demonstrated that quality basketball remains afloat in his veins. Surrounded by the right players, Garnett still can help Boston contend for a championship. After watching Garnett for 18 seasons, Kevin McHale — who drafted Garnett in Minnesota with the No. 5 pick in 1995 — still is amazed by his former student. Garnett was the first player in 20 years to go directly to the NBA from high school, and McHale recently reminisced about Garnett’€™s rookie training camp in Minnesota, when the 19-year-old was only a couple of months removed from his senior prom.

‘€œI loved the kid the first day of practice,’€ McHale said. ‘€œHe laid on the floor after his first training camp — laying on the ground with nothing left — and I said, ‘€˜We’ve got to go again tonight.’€™ He went, ‘€˜Huh?’€™ I said we did two-a-days, and he was like, ‘€˜Oh my.’€™

“But that night he came and he laid it on the ground, played on the line, laying on the ground, playing on the line. At the end, he was laying on the ground, and I said to him, ‘€˜Now we do two again tomorrow.’€™ He looked up at me and said, ‘€˜Man, this is going to be a job.’€™ He hasn’€™t changed since then, he’€™s just got better.

“His ability to compete at a high level for such a long time, his love of the game, his competitive nature,’€ marveled McHale, ‘€œit really is fun to watch.’€

Competing at a high level for an extended period of time in the National Basketball Association takes a rare talent. It is a skill that is difficult, but far from impossible. The highest standard of excellence has been set by the Spurs, a team with an aging superstar in soon-to-be-Hall-of-Famer Tim Duncan. Far from the best of friends, Garnett and the 37-year-old Duncan share very similar basketball philosophies, a fact not lost on Spurs coach Gregg Popovich.

‘€œThey can look in the mirror and realize they’€™re both the same in so many respects as far as how they run their lives in the NBA and how they’€™ve run their careers,’€ Popovich said during his last trip to Boston. ‘€œThey’€™re both competitive as hell, they both understand the game, they both love being on the court, and neither one of them is really that excited about the hoopla that is all around it, but they’€™ve also endured by taking care of their bodies and what they do in the summertime to take care of their bodies.’€

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Read More: Danny Ainge, Doc Rivers, Flip Saunders, Gregg Popovich
Brazilian legend Leandro Barbosa gets his kicks with Celtics 11.28.12 at 9:37 am ET
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Leandrinho. The Brazilian Blur. LB.

Leandro Barbosa has many different nicknames, but to anyone who has ever met the man, only one word will do.

Beloved.

‘€œThere was nobody who didn’€™t like LB,’€ said Jack McCallum, the longtime Sports Illustrated journalist and author of “Seven Seconds or Less,” a phenomenal snapshot of the Suns team — and the league — during the 2005-06 season. “LB was loved. He had a kind of innocence about him, and a real work ethic with the way he approached everything. He looked at himself as kind of an open book whereas a lot of guys who come into the NBA — guys without LB’€™s ability or talent — think they know everything, but LB was never like that.”

Barbosa, who celebrates his 30th birthday Wednesday, grew up in São Paulo, the world’€™s seventh largest city by population, and a hotbed for soccer.

“I’€™m from Brazil, so everybody knows about soccer,” said Barbosa, whose subtle accent still creeps up in conversation. “I used to play when I was a little kid, but I decide to play a different sport.”

Barbosa, the youngest of five children, wanted to play basketball for a pretty simple reason.  His brother played.

“My brother Arturo played professionally,” Barbosa said. “I always was around him; whatever he was doing, I wanted to do the same thing.  I decided to play basketball because of him. Arturo started teaching me how to play.”

Arturo, 20 years older than Barbosa, became a driving force in his little brother’€™s basketball career.

“Arturo was a pretty tough taskmaster,” McCallum said. “I don’€™t think those of us in the States really understand much about how kids in other countries learn the game. We just know they learn the game differently. LB still has scars from Arturo.”

McCallum wasn’€™t talking figuratively. If Barbosa made a mistake in his ball-handling drills, there were consequences. Arturo would whack him with a stick.

“I had to be quick with the ball, quick with my hands, because if I wasn’€™t, he slapped with me the stick,” said Barbosa, who still bears the scars on both hands. “At the time, as a kid, I was crying. I didn’€™t know why he was doing that. But if it wasn’€™t for all the work he put in, I don’€™t think I’€™d be here in the NBA. Those drills still stay with me.”

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Read More: Dan D'Antoni, Jack McCallum, Leandro Barbosa, Steve Nash
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