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Asset Management: Dwight Powell’s Celtics future 10.29.14 at 9:58 am ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Dwight Powell.

Dwight Powell

Dwight Powell

Other than looking a lot like Daniel Tosh, what else do you know about Dwight Powell? We’ll still be here when you get back from that interwebs search.

The Celtics have quietly stockpiled high-character, high-IQ players in the Brad Stevens era — through the draft (Marcus Smart) and the trade market (Tyler Zeller) — and Powell certainly fits that mold. The Pac-12 Scholar-Athlete of the Year as a senior at Stanford this past winter, he brings fundamental defense, sound shooting mechanics and deft passing to Boston.

Powell also brings a 6-foot-11, 240-pound frame to go along with impressive averages of 25.8 points, 12.6 rebounds and 5.7 assists per 100 college possessions. And yet the former top-25 high school recruit dropped to the 45th pick in this past June’s NBA draft and has since been traded twice — in packages for a pair of since released players (Scotty Hopson and Keith Bogans).

That’s because, according to DraftExpress, as a senior he lacked toughness on the boards, couldn’t consistently knock down jump shots and didn’t protect the rim, even if he earned another First Team All-Pac-12 selection. Powell showed more promise as a junior, when he logged a respectable 54.2 true shooting percentage, grabbed 24.0 percent of available defensive boards and submitted a 23.3 player efficiency rating a few months after his mother (living in Melrose, Mass.) died of cancer. Talk about toughness.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, Dwight Powell, NBA
WEEI.com predicts 2014-15 Boston Celtics season 10.29.14 at 8:59 am ET
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The Boston Celtics season is upon us, and our WEEI.com round table of Ben Rohrbach, Mike Petraglia, Kevin O’Connor, Julian Edlow and Sam Packard weighs in on five questions facing the C’s this season.

1. What will be Rajon Rondo‘s fate this season?

@brohrbach: We’ve seen “National TV” Rondo, but we’ve never really witnessed “Contract Year” Rondo, and that could be an awful lot of fun. He’s almost two years removed from the ACL surgery, and the broken bone in his hand appears to be only a minor setback. I’m on board with Celtics president Danny Ainge’s assessment that his four-time All-Star point guard will enjoy a career statistical year as the most exciting player on a blah team. Even then, haters will find something to complain about.

As for whether he’ll be traded or not, the Celtics will sure as heck try, but the number of teams in need of a starting point guard, willing to meet Ainge’s asking price and lining up to pay Rondo max money isn’t a long list. It’s a coin flip, but I’m now leaning more toward no deal than deal.

@Trags: Traded by January.

@KevinOconnorNBA: For Rondo to be dealt by Boston, another team needs to get desperate close to the trade deadline. Looking around the NBA, I don’€™t see many teams willing to cough up what it’€™ll take, so for now I think he’€™ll remain with the Celtics all season.

@julianedlow: Rondo plays the year out in Boston. If he was ever going to be traded, it needed to happen by draft night. There are just no realistic packages out there that make sense for Ainge to deal Rondo. I won’€™t venture a guess as to what happens after this season, but I guarantee it won’€™t be boring.

@SPackGuy: Starts over 75 games for the Celtics. Re-signs in the offseason after not being offered a max deal by any other team.

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Jared Sullinger, Kelly Olynyk, Marcus Smart
Marcus Smart could be much better if he just stops taking so many 3-pointers 10.29.14 at 7:15 am ET
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Marcus Smart

Marcus Smart

Marcus Smart’s shooting was a topic of many discussions during the preseason, to the point that it has begun to steal the spotlight from exactly what kind of player Danny Ainge and the Celtics may have acquired in Smart.

Smart is a premier defender and an elite athlete who may be much more talented on the offensive side of the ball than we give him credit for. We still need to see Smart play alongside Rajon Rondo, but so far Smart is the one who has been keeping himself from being far more efficient.

Ben Rohrbach wrote a well-researched piece earlier in the preseason that focused primarily on Smart’s poor 3-point shooting — something that Smart should try to stay away from early in his career. As Ben points out in his piece, Rondo and Avery Bradley both have significantly improved their shooting in one way or another since the beginning of their careers. So as a long-term goal, Smart never should give up on developing a shot from downtown in the NBA. But now is not the time to pretend to have one already.

Three-point shooting is something that Smart should be working on — and has been working on daily behind closed doors. But if he plays to his strengths, Smart can be far more efficient than we saw overall in the preseason. He did give us glimpses, though, and they looked mighty good.

The best example of what Smart is capable of came in the preseason finale against the Nets. Smart only played 16 minutes, but he dropped 16 points to go along with his four assists and two steals. The important part is that Smart shot 5-for-8 from the field, including 3-for-3 in the paint and 4-for-4 from the free throw line. The numbers can’t get any more efficient than that, but they can grow in volume. Smart rarely attempts 2-point field goals. So much so that he only attempted two per game in preseason action.

Are you ready for this? Smart attempted 7.5 field goals per game in the preseason and 5.5 of them were 3-pointers! This is a 25 percent 3-point shooter we’re talking about who attempted a league-leading 44 3-pointers in the preseason (and made just 11, if you’re not good at math).

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Asset Management: Vitor Faverani’s Celtics future 10.28.14 at 6:52 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Vitor Faverani.

Vitor Faverani

Vitor Faverani

Ever since Boston heard Vitor Faverani’s name, he’s been an enigma. The Brazilian behemoth arrived at media day last year and declared, “It’s not difficult coming here; it’s the best team in NBA,” and then amassed 18 rebounds, 12 points and six blocks as the Celtics‘ starting center in their home opener. Only one other player matched that stat line all of last year: Anthony Davis.

A year later, we’ve learned little about the so-called “El Hombre Indestructible.” After losing his starting job to Jared Sullinger and seeing his minutes steadily decline before undergoing season-ending knee surgery on a torn left meniscus, Faverani proved the project many expected when he arrived from the Euroleague.

His averages of 12.1 points, 9.4 rebounds and two blocks per 36 minutes as an NBA rookie remain encouraging, even if advanced metrics (11.0 player efficiency rating, 50.2 true shooting percentage and a minus-5.5 overall rating per 100 possessions) suggest otherwise in a limited 488-minute sample size.

At the very least, we can all agree he’s not Anthony Davis. Who is he, then?

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, NBA, Vitor Faverani
Asset Management: Brandon Bass’ Celtics future 10.28.14 at 4:09 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Brandon Bass.

The Celtics shopped Bass at the trade deadline, and over the summer we learned from Grantland’s Zach Lowe that team president Danny Ainge has “tried like hell” to move the veteran forward. Yet, he remains in Boston. For now.

The Bass experience has been a strange one. He collected 20 points and 11 rebounds in his first game for the Celtics — on Christmas Day of the lockout-shortened 2011-12 season — and then came off the bench for a few months as he adjusted to Kevin Garnett‘s defensive demands. Doc Rivers finally inserted Bass into the starting lineup around the All-Star break, the C’s won 60 percent of their games down the stretch and they made a surprising run to the 2012 Eastern Conference finals, aided by 27 points from Bass in Game 5 against the 76ers.

Boston came to love Bass for his understated, undersized and — at the time — undervalued effort. The 6-foot-8, 240-pound brick quietly protected the paint defensively and knocked down mid-range jump shots at a remarkable rate (49 percent) offensively in 2011-12. He was an appropriate complement on a team that still required touches for Garnett, Paul Pierce, Ray Allen and Rajon Rondo.

The ensuing summer, Bass signed a three-year, $19.35 million contract that seemed appropriate for a 27-year-old starting power forward on an Eastern Conference contender. And then everything went south.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, Brandon Bass, NBA
Rajon Rondo upgrades himself to having an 83 percent chance of playing Wednesday night 10.28.14 at 1:50 pm ET
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With the Celtics‘€™ season-opener rapidly approaching, the question still remains — will Rajon Rondo be ready to play in Wednesday’s first game of the year?

It’€™s clear that Rondo has been improving, but he still can’€™t resist poking some fun at the media in the process. At Monday’s practice, Rondo gave himself a 79 percent chance of playing against the Nets on Wednesday. Then on Tuesday according to reports, Rondo told Brad Stevens he had upgraded himself to having an 83 percent chance of playing.

Rondo went on to say that he doesn’€™t like being called a game-time decision and he will decide whether or not he plays just a few hours before the game begins when he wakes up from his nap around 4:30 on Wednesday.

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Asset Management: Gerald Wallace’s Celtics future 10.27.14 at 11:04 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Gerald Wallace.

There are 58 players who will earn eight-figure salaries in the NBA this season, and only three of them project to fall outside a team’s top-six rotation when healthy: Gerald Wallace, Amar’e Stoudemire and Javale McGee.

Unlike Stoudemire, Wallace has another year left on the four-year, $40 million deal he signed in 2012. The Knicks can either let Stoudemire walk at the end of the season or find another team looking to shed $23.4 million from its books next summer. Meanwhile, the Celtics would have to part with too many assets to have any hope of shipping Wallace in a package this winter. And unlike McGee, Wallace isn’t seven feet tall and 26 years old. He turned 32 over the summer and sits third on the wing depth chart behind Jeff Green and Evan Turner, taking minutes from James Young on a roster built to develop younger players.

Wallace averaged 5.1 points (54.3 true-shooting percentage), 3.7 rebounds and 2.5 assists in 24.4 minutes per game last season, submitting the worst player efficient rating (10.0) of his career. It felt like he missed more than a third of last season, but the veteran forward actually appeared in 58 games before undergoing season-ending surgeries on the torn left meniscus in his left knee and the bone spurs in his left ankle.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, gerald wallace, NBA
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