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Glen Davis meets John Havlicek and learns a lesson about toughness 05.05.11 at 4:43 pm ET
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WALTHAM — The Celtics aren’t in the easiest spot right now. They’re banged up. They’re getting outworked and they’re down two games to a Miami Heat team that many consider the odds-on favorite right now to capture the NBA title.

But alas, not all hope is lost. Just ask Glen Davis, who Thursday at Celtics practice had a chance encounter with a Celtics legend of the past who told Davis to just hang in there. After all – as the Ringo Starr song goes – It Don’t Come Easy. Just like John Havlicek told Davis.

“The frustration, things not working out, you can get all messed up. But I was talking to Havlicek today, you know, ‘Havlicek Stole the Ball’ and I said which one of these [championship] banners were you 0-2, and he said the one that stood out to him was 1969. When they were down 0-2, they came back to win it in Game 7 against the Lakers.”

That was the series, of course, that featured the Don Nelson shot that bounced straight up after hitting the back of the rim and came down through the net at the old Los Angeles Arena to put the Celtics on top and lead them to their 11th title with Bill Russell in the organization. It also marked the only time the Celtics ever won a series after losing the first two games.

“He was just saying, ‘It’s going to take everything in you to fight and claw back and get back to get to 2-2 even but then it’s going to take something special to finish them off.’”

Can they do it against the Miami Heat? Davis said Thursday after practice that getting back to the mental and physical toughness that makes the Celtics a great team would be a good place to start.

“We didn’t play Celtics basketball,” Davis said. “Nobody played the way they were supposed to play. Ray had a good game the first game but we still didn’t pull it off. We all were supposed to play well but we didn’t. It’s easy to point the finger and blame and play the blame game as Kanye West would say but you’ve got to go get it. That’s all it is right now. X’s and O’s and you can coach as much as you want but that still ain’t going to make it happen.”

Read More: 2011 NBA Playoffs, Big Baby, Boston Celtics, Glen Davis
Paul Pierce on getting touches late: ‘I’m not going to make that an issue’ 03.24.11 at 10:51 am ET
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Sometimes Paul Pierce can display a misleading, almost nervous, smile after a befuddling loss.

Wednesday night was such a case.

Pierce was asked whether he would like to get his hands on the ball more down the stretch, especially when the Celtics were trailing by three and his team needed a big basket. Pierce did get the ball but with 4.2 seconds left, leaving the C’s captain to fire a desperate trey that fell short.

In the 30 seconds before that, Rajon Rondo (a runner) and Glen Davis (an ill-advised three-pointer) missed shots that would’ve tied or given the Celtics the lead against the Grizz.

“We ran some stuff,” Pierce said. “We had the turnover right there down the stretch. For the most part I liked the looks we got. We got Big Baby with a nice shot. Less than 30 seconds we get Rondo right in the paint, going up for a shot that he takes all the time and makes. I’ll take that for a game winner. It just didn’t go our way today.”

Yes, Pierce would like to have touched the ball a little more but he said he didn’t want the team forcing the ball to him.

“Probably a little bit more, but I play within the framework of the offense,” Pierce said. “I’m not going to make that an issue. We’ve been winning the way we play all year long and the last four years. I’m not going to make that an issue.”

Doc Rivers had a different take.

“We’ve got to score more points,” Rivers said. “I thought in the second half we went through that one stretch where we didn’t even start our offense until like seven seconds on the clock. Milking the clock; I thought the ball just was bounced and didn’t move. Whenever we do that. You know, listen, I think as a whole, our team, we’ve got to get back to understanding – you know Paul is pretty good. And he’s got to get more touches in games. And I think we go back and forth on movement and we want that, but we’ve also got to get Paul involved. That’s on me; I’ve got to get Paul involved more.”

Pierce and the Celtics were also cautioned by their coaches before the game that the Grizzlies were one of the best offensive teams they’ll see in the paint this season. Despite all the pleading and prodding during film sessions, the Grizzlies came out and doubled the C’s 52-26 in the paint.

“I am surprised because the whole emphasis of today was they are one of the best, if not the best in the league at points in the paint,” Pierce said. “The emphasis was to pack the paint, they aren’t a great three point shooting team so there is no excuse for all that. We should have done a better job in there, make them kick it out and make them knock down a couple of jumpers.

“I thought overall, for the most part we played pretty good defense. We held them to what, 90 points. Especially Zach Randolph, he has been playing out of his mind. A lot of these guys have been playing well. I thought it was a pretty strong defensive game.”

The Celtics also committed 20 turnovers on their home court, which they haven’t exactly been defending that well, especially against teams from the West.

Are the C’s tired? Sure, but as they themselves admitted, who isn’t at this time of the season?

“The light is at the end of the tunnel, only a few more games left,” Pierce said. “It should be a better sense of urgency I believe around here. Especially finishing off the season on a good note and trying to get that home court advantage in the East.”

Read More: Big Baby, Boston Celtics, Doc Rivers, Glen Davis
Irish Coffee: Big Baby buoys bench 12.02.10 at 1:29 pm ET
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Wake up with the Celtics and your daily dose of Irish Coffee …

 

BOSTON — In the aftermath of Wednesday night’s 99-95 victory against the Blazers, Celtics forward Glen Davis sat, seemingly exhausted, at his locker.

Following what may have been his most complete and efficiently productive game in a Celtics uniform, Davis had earned the rest. He had just recorded 16 points (7-of-9 FG; 2-2 FT) and seven rebounds in 29 minutes, including a stretch of eight straight points and three consecutive 20-foot jumpers over  a three-minute span in the third quarter that singlehandedly kep the Celtics within striking distance of the Blazers.

“I took the shots that were given to me,” said Davis. “That’s what it’s about.”

Taking that notion further, what it’s really all about is making those shots, and Davis has done that at a remarkable rate this season, shooting 50 percent from the floor — the highest clip of his four-year career. The benefit of that is two-fold: 1) obviously, points on the board, and 2) opening up opportunities for his teammates.

“If I can spread the floor, I can help out Kevin [Garnett],” said Davis. “Teams won’t double-team him. They’ve got to guard me.”

Boston Celtics' Glen Davis falls into the crowd during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Toronto Raptors, Sunday, Nov. 21, 2010, in Toronto. The Raptors defeated the Celtics 102-101.

Glen Davis has captured the trust of pretty much everyone in Boston, including the fans. (AP)

In this space, before the season started, I presented an argument for Davis as a potential NBA Sixth Man of the Year winner: “Given any injury to Shaquille or Jermaine O’Neal, Davis would be the first to gobble up those minutes. Is there any reason he couldn’t average 14 points and six rebounds in 25 minutes a game?”

Through 18 games this season, he’s averaging career highs of 11.1 points and 5.3 rebounds in 29.4 minutes per game — but it’s his efficiency and versatility that have vaulted him into the NBA’s Sixth Man discussion.

Assume the role of a go-to scorer as a power forward for the one of the best benches in the league? Sure. Perform the “little things” — like taking charges — as the center alongside Rajon Rondo, Ray Allen, Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett down the stretch of close games? Done. Drag smaller defenders into the post? Easy (especially with his frame). Pull bigger defenders away from the basket? Not a problem.

So, what does being in the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year conversation mean to Davis?

“Nothing, until you win it,” he said. “You can talk all you out. You can say, ‘He’s top two, he’s top whatever.’ It doesn’t really count until you’re No. 1 at the end of the season, when you’re having a press conference, congratulating your team and thanking all the people who helped you get that award. I’d be excited to get it. Just to be considered is not enough for me.”

Celtics head coach Doc Rivers told Dennis & Callahan on WEEI on Thursday morning that he was in Danny Ainge‘s ear, urging him to select Davis with the 35th pick in the 2007 NBA Draft. Rivers knew Big Baby’s potential, because he’d seen Davis succeed against his sons and the nation’s top talent on the AAU circuit.

“But we didn’t know he was going to be this good,” Rivers admitted.

After struggling with some maturity issues over his first few seasons in the league, Davis has earned the trust of not only Rivers but all of his teammates as well.

“Most definitely,” said Davis. “I’ve been here for four years now, and that’s Doc’s system. You’ve got to trust his players. He’s looking at me as a player that he trusts.”

DOC RIVERS: COACH OF THE MONTH

The NBA named Rivers the Eastern Conference Coach of the Month prior to the Celtics’ victory against the Blazers. It didn’t mean much to Doc, but Garnett elaborated:

“I love him,’’ Garnett told The Boston Globe. “I told Danny that the day y’all get rid of Doc is the day I sort of tip my hat and thank the Boston area and the Boston fans. I love Doc, he’s a credit to our success and the building of the players, because he’s always motivating and he’s always pushing you, finding ways to get you rekindled.’’

IN SUPPORT OF BILL RUSSELL

In case you missed it, our own Paul Flannery detailed why the Celtics should build a statue outside of the Garden in Bill Russell‘s honor. In a fantastic Boston Magazine piece, he builds an argument that’s pretty hard to disagree with. Here’s a nugget:

In Boston, we now have statues of three sports figures – Bobby Orr, Red Auerbach, and Ted Williams – sprinkled throughout the city. (Williams, oddly, also has a tunnel named after him.) That’s quite a list, actually. But there’s one glaring omission: the one sports star – no disrespect here to Teddy Ballgame or Tom Brady – who left a bigger mark on this city than any other. I’m talking about a guy who won 11 championships in 13 seasons. Whose name has become synonymous with victory, hard work, and shared sacrifice. I’m talking about Bill Russell.

This is a disappointing oversight – absurd, really, given Russell’s accomplishments – but a correctable one. What we need is a Bill Russell statue outside the Garden, where the greatest Celtic of them all will stand watch over the franchise he helped build.

KOBE BRYANT: ‘WE’RE SLOW’

Wednesday night’s loss to the Rockets marked the first four-game losing streak for the Lakers since they acquired Pau Gasol. So, what’s the reason for the skid? ESPN.com presented that question to Kobe Bryant:

The general assessment of the team by its players remained that the team had a lot of work to do on both offense and defense, leading to a chicken-or-the-egg type of situation about which is more damning when it’s lousy.

“We’re slow. We’re slow. We’re slow. We’re slow on rotations,” Bryant said, picking on the defense and maybe subconsciously mentioning the word once for every consecutive loss.

THE LEBRON JAMES SAGA

You may not have heard, but a guy named LeBron James who plays for a team called the Miami Heat is returning to his hometown to take on a team by the name of the Cavaliers. The Cleveland Plain Dealer consulted everyone from players to fans to therapists to clergy in order to determine what the reaction should be. Here’s Cavs point guard Mo Williams’ take:

“This game is not just for us. It’s for 20,000 fans and for the millions watching and pulling for us. We’ve got people that ain’t even Cavs fans pulling for us. We’ve got a lot behind us.”

Lost in all the discussion of LeBron’s return to Cleveland is this: Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert has launced a probe into alleged tampering by the Heat in their pursuit of James, according to Yahoo! Sports:

Prior to the start of free agency on July 1, no Miami Heat representative – including star Dwyane Wade  was allowed to discuss with James the specific circumstances around Wade, Toronto’s Chris Bosh and James joining together with the Heat.

One focus of the law firm’s probe includes an alleged Pat Riley-James meeting in Miami in November 2009, and a meeting of James’ inner circle with Wade in Chicago in June 2010, sources said.

Riley, James, Wade and Bosh have denied there was a predetermined collusion in the historic free-agent binge, although the players have admitted to discussing the possibility of playing together as far back as the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

If Gilbert’s accusations turn out to be truths, the Heat could lose draft picks. As if there weren’t enough drama surrounding Thursday night’s Cavs-Heat game.

(Have a question, concern or conception for tomorrow’s Irish Coffee? Send a message to @brohrbach on Twitter.)

Read More: Big Baby, Boston Celtics, Doc Rivers, Glen Davis
Celtics’ Glen Davis taking charge 11.17.10 at 10:56 pm ET
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Boston Celtics' Glen Davis dunks over Miami Heat's Chris Bosh during the second half of Boston's 88-80 win in an NBA basketball game in Boston on Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010.

Glen Davis is doing more than just scoring off the bench for the Celtics. (AP)

Glen Davis is leading the charge on, well, charges. The Celtics’ Sixth Man drew his league-leading 17th offensive foul in Tuesday night’s 114-83 blowout victory over the Washington Wizards.

“A wise man once told me a pig sacrifices more than a chicken,” said Davis. “I just want to be a pig.”

The statistic isn’t officially tracked by the NBA, but Davis is lobbying for it, arguing that they work two ways — turning the ball over in your favor and giving the opposing team an additional foul.

“They keep track of how many shots of yours you get blocked, don’t they?” said Davis, who contributed two points, eight rebounds, two assists and two steals in the win. “I think I led the league in that one year. So, why not charges?”

Big Baby said he learned how to take a charge from former teammate James Posey during the 2007-08 season. According to Davis, the key to the charge is deception — making opponents believe you’re going to foul them and holding your ground in the final moment (“I look at my feet every time”). It’s that timing in addition to his knowledge of help defense, the team’s rotations and thier scouting reports that have led to Davis’ success in that area.

“I don’t like to flop,” said Davis. “When I take a charge, somebody is going to have to run into me.”

Davis said it took a week to fully shake off a charge he took against the Dallas Mavericks’ Caron Butler. So, do they all hurt that much?

“All of them do,” said Davis. “There’s not one that does not hurt. But every one is worth it. The only one that’s not is the one where I get hit in the gonads.”

Just don’t hit the pig in the gonads. Got that everybody?

Read More: Big Baby, Boston Celtics, charge, Glen Davis
Davis helps give back in a big way 08.19.10 at 12:37 am ET
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Davis plays the drums during a tour of the Plummer Home for Boys (photo courtesy of the Boston Celtics)

Davis plays the drums during a tour of the Plummer Home for Boys (photo courtesy of the Boston Celtics)

Glen Davis has been visiting deserving children this week and presenting them with a new home basketball court as part of the RE/MAX of New England Home Court Program contest.

This year’s winners included the Plummer Home for Boys of Salem and the Cassidy family of Haverhill. A total of three winners were selected from hundreds of entrants who submitted letters explaining why they were in need of a home court makeover.

Davis, along with Cedric Maxwell, conducted community basketball clinics with the winners. The Plummer Home for Boys also received a donation from the Forever Young Foundation and the Cassidy family received a bedroom makeover.

For more information on the RE/MAX of New England Home Court Program contest, visit www.celtics.com.

Read More: Big Baby, Celtics, Glen Davis,
Big Baby knows refs aren’t to blame for everything 06.09.10 at 4:15 am ET
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Yes, it was another frustrating night of whistles for the Celtics on Tuesday night as the Lakers handed Boston a 91-84 homecourt loss at TD Garden in Game 3 of the 2010 NBA finals.

But Glen Davis is more than aware that the officials can’t be blame for all of the calls that went against them. Just a few key ones.

“We didn’t close out,” Davis said. ” I think at the beginning of the game, the first team established the tempo. I think the bench came out and really didn’t apply the pressure and that’s how we lost the lead.”

Indeed, the Celtics led, 12-5 out of the gate but thanks in very large part to the play of the Laker bench, which outscored Boston’s 16-8 in the first half, the visitors went on a 21-5 run to end the first quarter and never relinquished the lead again.

“I think a lot of the things in the first half, we just didn’t do right. I think we’ve got to be ready to play when we go in there. I blame it on myself, not establishing tempo, not bringing enough energy, turning the ball over, shooting bad shots. If I helped a little bit more in the first half, I think we would have done a better job.”

Davis was very aware of what was going on in the first half as the Celtics fell behind, 37-20, early in the second quarter.

“We had to dig our way back from [their] 17-point lead,” said Davis, who then had a very interesting take on the much-discussed and highly-criticized officials in this series.

“We did a great job of fighting back but then, calls didn’t go our way,” he said. “Referees aren’t perfect, they’re human, they’re going to make mistakes. Hopefully, they’ll see that some calls weren’t the right calls. But they did their best. I tip my hat to them. It’s tough in an environment like this to make the right call with thousands of people screaming at you, so it is what it is. I tip my hat to those guys.”

Read More: Big Baby, Celtics, Glen Davis, Lakers
What Big Papi Sees in Big Baby 06.01.10 at 12:21 am ET
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The first time David Ortiz saw Glen Davis, he thought he was looking at a football player.

But the more Big Papi got to know Big Baby, the more he saw himself.

“When I’ve watched him playing for the past few years, he kind of gave me goosebumps because he’s just a guy that told me straight up who he wanted to be,” said Ortiz.

When Ortiz met Davis at Josh Beckett’s charity bowling event during Davis’ rookie year, he was surprised to learn the “humongous dude” was actually one of the newest members of the Celtics. The two shared a brief conversation, one that has stood out in Ortiz’s mind for years.

“He said, ‘I’m trying to work hard because I want to be one of them. I want people to remember me in this city as a great player, and I’m working hard to get to it,’” Ortiz recalled. “So I said, ‘Keep on doing what you’re doing and you’re going to be just fine.’”

Davis’ ambition reminded Ortiz of his own. As Ortiz listened to the young athlete, he was taken back to the time when he was an eager ballplayer who had just joined the Red Sox from the Minnesota Twins.

He remembered how anxious he was to put his stamp on Boston, the same sense of excitement Davis exuded.

“That’s the reason exactly why he caught my attention a lot,” Ortiz said. “I remember when I first got here with the Red Sox coming from Minnesota and there’s nothing but history and great players around. I remember my agent telling me, ‘If you go to this city and play well and help the team to win a World Series, they’re going to remember you forever.’ And I busted my tail off just to do that because it was my goal. Now watching him doing the same thing, it brings me highlights and memories back.”

Now Ortiz enjoys the highlights created by Davis on the court.

“Big Boy, I’m watching his game all the time,” he said. Ortiz applauds Davis’ energy, cheers for his intensity, and thinks he is simply “awesome.”

“Just watching him playing and watching him doing his thing out there hustling, he wanted to show the world that he was there, that he is the one guy they could count on,” said Ortiz.

Davis is hard at work making sure the Celtics, Ortiz, and the city of Boston can do just that.

Read More: Big Baby, Big Papi, Celtics, David Ortiz
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