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Why you should care about Wednesday’s Celtics loss: Tyler Zeller emerged, and Evan Turner was ejected 10.15.14 at 10:00 pm ET
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Tyler Zeller

Tyler Zeller

On a night when Celtics coach Brad Stevens declared Kelly Olynyk “tough to unseat” for the starting center spot, Tyler Zeller broke out of his slump, converting all six of his shots and emerging as a potential solution to the C’s rim-protecting woes in a 92-89 preseason loss to the Raptors in Portland, Maine.

Zeller entered averaging 5.8 points and 3.2 rebounds with just one block in 75 total minutes. In 12 first-half minutes against Toronto, he broke out for 11 points, three boards and a trio of blocks, anchoring a 13-3 run to tie the game at the half. He finished with 13 points, four rebounds, three assists and the three blocks in 18 minutes.

The 7-footer played well off the pick-and-roll with Evan Turner, who assisted Zeller’s first four buckets, all inside of 4 feet. And the C’s enjoyed their best string of basketball with both Zeller and Olynyk (6 points, 7 rebounds) in the frontcourt.

OTHER REASONS TO CARE AOBUT CELTICS-RAPTORS:

Avery Bradley pulled a Paul Pierce. With eight seconds remaining, Bradley (13 points) made a step-back elbow jumper to tie the game at 89-89. But Lou Williams answered with a 3-pointer over Bradley with 0.6 seconds left, and Jared Sullinger’s buzzer-beating heave bounced off the back of the rim.

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Toronto Raptors, Tyler Zeller,
Asset Management: Evan Turner’s Celtics future at 6:08 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Evan Turner.

Evan Turner isn’t this good.

At least, he hasn’t been, not at the NBA level. Through four preseason games with the Celtics, though, Turner is producing at a level we haven’t seen since his Ohio State days, and there’s reason to believe he can maintain that success.

His performance on the 76ers and briefly the Pacers hasn’t proved worthy of the No. 2 pick in 2010. The averages of 13.7 points, 5.7 rebounds and 3.8 assists from 2011-13 aren’t so bad, but he’s never posted a true shooting percentage better than 50 percent and submitted a PER (12.4) worse than the C’s top seven rotation players last season. Likewise, his assist-to-turnover ratio (1.39) ranked among the league’s worst for guards who dominated the ball as much as he did in 2013-14. By few measures has Turner been a productive basketball player.

All of which seems strange for a 6-foot-7, 205-pound consensus collegiate player of the year who was considered by DraftExpress “a dynamic shot-creator” and “one of the best perimeter stoppers in the draft” after three seasons on the Buckeyes. What happened to the guy who ranked among the 10 most efficient college players in 2009-10?

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, Evan Turner, NBA
Is Celtics’ Marcus Smart really this bad a shooter? 10.13.14 at 1:48 pm ET
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Marcus Smart

Marcus Smart

If you’re one of the many folks still ripping Rajon Rondo and Avery Bradley‘s perimeter shooting, wait until you get a load of Celtics rookie Marcus Smart.

Following a trend that’s been in decline since his days at appropriately named Marcus High in Flower Mound, Texas, Smart is attempting a higher rate of his shots from distance, even as his 3-point percentage progressively worsens.

Let’s take a look at Smart’s shooting percentages from inside the 3-point line — where he’s an exceptional finisher at the rim and gets to the free throw line with tremendous effectiveness — and beyond it since his junior year of high school.

2010-11 (high school junior): 176-292 2P (.603), 29-84 3P (.345)
2011-12 (high school senior): 143-216 2P (.577), 41-110 3P (.372)
2012-13 (Oklahoma State freshman): 113-243 2P (.465), 38-131 3P (.290)
2013-14 (Oklahoma State sophomore): 114-222 2P (.514), 49-164 3P (.299)
2014-15 (summer league/preseason): 14-41 2P (.342), 13-56 3P (.232)

At the prep level, Smart could get to the rim with ease, but his 6-foot-4, 226-pound frame becomes less of an advantage as the competition level rises. Likewise, scouting plays an increased role at each stage, and defenses are designed to encourage Smart’s shooting while discouraging his penetration.

As a result, the Celtics rookie’s long-distance attempts have increased from 27.6 percent of his total shots in high school to 38.8 percent in college and now 57.7 percent in nine games of summer league and preseason action. Granted, that’s a limited sample size in the NBA — where the 3-point distance is greater and he may be attempting more exhibition 3’s to adjust — but Smart’s excessive poor 3-point shooting remains a concern.

As usual, DraftExpress did a nice job of breaking down Smart’s catch-and-shoot struggles at Oklahoma State, where he was just as bad — if not worse — from mid-range as he was from 3, per shotanalytics.com.

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Marcus Smart, NBA,
Asset Management: James Young’s Celtics future 10.10.14 at 6:01 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: James Young.

James Young

James Young

Young’s received an awful lot of praise before he’s played a regular-season NBA game. It’s curious how analysts already determined he’s the next Paul Pierce, Ray Allen or Bradley Beal, or why Comcast commentators questioned Avery Bradley‘s signing since Young is so clearly the starting shooting guard in waiting.

It’s a wonder he slipped to No. 17 in the draft. Maybe all they needed to see was his 20-point performance in the national title game, since a season-long look at Young’s Kentucky production reveals a worse true shooting percentage (53.6) than Marcus Smart (55.2), the other Celtics rookie whose stroke has been roundly criticized. Or maybe Young’s 3-for-8 effort in his preseason debut was enough to anoint him, since he missed all of Summer League with a concussion.

Truth is, James Young is a project. At the end of the 19-year-old’s assignment, we may look back on him as a steal. But odds are Danny Ainge didn’t find the next great Celtic in the latter half of the first round, especially since the C’s president has long stated that fewer stars existed in the 2014 draft than most believed.

Still, the early returns on Young are encouraging, at least from his coach’s perspective.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, James Young, NBA
Rodney McGruder flushes fantastic alley-oop in Celtics preseason blowout of the Knicks 10.08.14 at 11:15 pm ET
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In all likelihood, Tim Frazier and Rodney McGruder won’t be on the Celtics much longer, but the two combined for a memorable highlight in a 106-86 preseason blowout of the Knicks in lovely downtown Hartford. Frazier’s alley-oop feed found a flushing McGruder. Not to be confused with “MacGruber,” despite the flowing hair. #RippingThroats

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Rodney McGruder, Tim Frazier,
Why You Should Care About Wednesday’s Celtics Win: Jared Sullinger, Marcus Smart stand out at 10:27 pm ET
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Jared Sullinger

Jared Sullinger

HARTFORD — The Boston Celtics beat the New York Knicks 106-86 Wednesday night at Hartford’s XL Center in Hartford (see box score here). With few standout individual performances beyond Jared Sullinger’s 23 points on 12 shots, the real star of Thursday night’€™s game was the Celtics‘ team defense.

The Celtics played  aggressive,  jumping in passing lanes and contesting jump shots. They finished with x14 steals and held the Knicks to 40 percent shooting.

The young Celtics guards, especially Marcus Smart and Avery Bradley, played at a frantic pace, leading to a number of scoring opportunities in transition. And the Knicks did not do themselves any favors, as they committed 28 turnovers.

Self-proclaimed underrated supserstar Carmelo Anthony also struggled, scoring just 10 points on 3-of-9 shooting from the field opposite Evan Turner.

OTHER REASONS TO CARE AOBUT CELTICS-KNICKS:

Marcus Smart made a shot!

Four, actually. After an 0-for during his NBA debut, Smart scored 11 points on 4-of-8 shooting. He scored 10 points, including a pair of 3-pointers, in the second quarter. Smart, who normally looks to attack the basket, showed no hesitation taking jump shots. He also looked adept at running the offense, leading the team with six assists.

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Jared Sullinger, Marcus Smart, New York Knicks
Asset Management: Marcus Thornton’s Celtics future at 12:38 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Marcus Thornton.

Marcus Thornton

Marcus Thornton

The second-round pick that later became Marcus Thornton was traded for a dude named Stanko Barac when “Li’l Buckets” was still a Kilgore College sophomore, and thus his well traveled NBA road was paved before it even started.

Dealt again on draft day for a pair of future second-round picks, the LSU transfer immediately launched an assault on a list of doubters that’s weirdly evergrowing for a player whose NBA potential as a volume scorer was rather accurately assessed by DraftExpress from the start. In his only full season on the Hornets, Thornton averaged 14.5 points on 55.0 percent true shooting in 25.6 minutes a night alongside point guards Chris Paul and fellow rookie Darren Collison.

Traded in season twice — from New Orleans to Sacramento for Carl Landry in 2011 and from the Kings to the Brooklyn Nets for Jason Terry and Reggie Evans last season — Thornton has been consistently productive ever since. The 6-foot-4, 205-pound shooting guard has averaged between 17.3 and 20.3 points per 36 minutes and produced a PER between 14.0 and 18.2 each step of the way — save for a 46-game stretch in Mike Malone’s system to start last season.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, Marcus Thornton, NBA
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