Green Street
NEED TO KNOW
Don't forget to follow Ben on Twitter.
A WEEI.com Celtics Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Dennis Rodman’
On 25th anniversary, looking back at Larry Bird’s famous steal vs. Pistons 05.25.12 at 10:37 am ET
By   |  Comments Off

Saturday marks the 25th anniversary of not only one of the greatest plays in Boston sports history, but one of the most memorable moments in NBA history.

In Game 5 of the 1987 Eastern Conference finals at the Boston Garden against the Pistons, Celtics forward Larry Bird added on to his legend, turning an almost sure defeat in a pivotal game into a stunning victory in the matter of seconds.

With the C’s trailing by a point in the closing seconds, Bird drove the lane and had his shot blocked by Dennis Rodman. With the ball heading out of bounds, Celtics guard Jerry Sichting tried to save it, but it was knocked off his body and the Pistons received possession, setting up the theatrics. With five seconds left, Isiah Thomas hurriedly tried to inbound the ball and lobbed a pass to Bill Laimbeer, who was standing on the baseline near the Celtics basket.

What Thomas didn’t see was Bird, who timed the pass perfectly and flew in from his position at the top of the key to steal the ball, a remarkable play that gave the Celtics sudden life with the final seconds winding down.

“Isiah’s pass just hung up there,” Bird recalled in a 2009 ESPN story about the play. “It seemed to take forever to get to Laimbeer. [After stealing the pass], I was thinking about shooting, but the ball was going the other way and so was my momentum.”

Narrowly avoiding falling out of bounds, Bird found Dennis Johnson streaking down the lane and sent him the pass. Johnson grabbed it and without hesitation laid the ball off the backboard and in as the Celtics took an improbable 108-107 lead with one second left.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: Bill Laimbeer, Celtics, Dennis Johnson, Dennis Rodman
Dennis Rodman’s emotional Hall of Fame Speech 08.13.11 at 11:05 am ET
By   |  8 Comments

There have rarely been more polarizing figures in the NBA than Dennis Rodman. While some admired his relentless, and selfless, approach to rebounding and defense, others chafed at his vainglorious self-promotion and indulgent behavior, both on and off the court.

Rodman rarely asked for forgiveness on either count and seemed to hover between two lives: entirely self-confident and filled with doubt. It was these two polar extremes that were on display in his Hall of Fame induction speech on Friday in Springfield that hovered between moving and at times almost despondent.

Rodman talked about the father that left him when he was five years old and sought to capitalize on his fame by writing a book about him but never seeking to make contact, while at the same time apologizing to his mother, wife and kids. “I had one regret,” Rodman said, choking up. “I wish I was a better father.”

His broke down often during his speech that also supplied some humor. Rodman relayed the story of his arrival in Chicago when coach Phil Jackson asked if he’d like to play with the Bulls. “Go in the kitchen and tell Scottie Pippen you’re sorry,” Jackson told him.

It has been said many times that we will never see another player like Larry Bird, Magic Johnson or Michael Jordan. That may be true, but it is practically assured that we will never see another personality like Rodman.

Dennis Rodman 2011 Hall Of Fame Speech (VIDEO) by 3030fm

Read More: Dennis Rodman,
Inside the Game: Shelden Williams and the Art of Rebounding 01.05.10 at 10:41 pm ET
By   |  3 Comments

For a player whose career had been filled with uncertainties, one thing was for sure about Shelden Williams.

‘€œShelden has proven he can defend and rebound,’€ President of Basketball Operations Danny Ainge said at Williams’ introductory press conference this summer.

The Celtics were drawn to those defensive skills when they signed him during the offseason. They were looking to add another big man to their bench and believed he had the potential to help their team down low.

His rebounding contributions are even more critical now that Kevin Garnett is sidelined. Although he is not the first man off the bench,  Williams tries to make an impression on the boards whenever he can.

Before he began his NBA career, Williams had made his mark on Duke University. In fact, he had made it on backboards around the NCAA.

He graduated from Duke in 2006 as the school’s all-time leader in rebounds and blocked shots. Williams pulled down 1,262 boards over his four-year career and averaged 9.1 boards per game, including 11.2 as a junior. He became the third player in NCAA history to score 1,500 points, nab 1,000 rebounds, block 350 shots, and pick off 150 steals, while earning consecutive Defensive Player of the Year honors.

Williams was selected by the Hawks with the fifth pick in the 2006 Draft. That season he led all rookies in double-doubles and ranked third on his team in rebounds. Even as his playing time decreased and he was eventually traded (he was sent from the Hawks to the Kings to the Timberwolves over the course of two seasons), Williams stayed focused on attacking the boards.

Now on the Celtics, he has accepted the team’s defensive mentality. He is currently averaging 3.5 boards in 13.5 minutes and has recorded 8-, 9-, and 10-rebound games. Even though Williams has only played a total of 377 minutes (9th on team), he has recorded 99 rebounds (7th). He has also grabbed 33 offensive boards (4th), more than Rasheed Wallace and just seven shy of Garnett in 500 less minutes.

As part of WEEI.com’s ‘€œInside the Game’€ series with the Celtics, Williams explained the art of attacking the glass.

Learning at a Young Age: As a teenager, Williams led Midwest City High School (OK) to the Oklahoma Class 6A State Championship.
‘€œI was taught that very early on. My dad always told me about the importance of rebounding and playing defense. Those are two things that are will. If you want to do it, you have a will to do it. Those two things were taught to me at an early age and just kind of stuck.’€

His American Idol: The soft-spoken Williams admired one of the most colorful athletes to ever play the game of basketball.
‘€œDuring my time period coming up, it was Dennis Rodman. He was always going after every single rebound whether he’d be over the top or not. I think that watching him be relentless, I learned from that.’€

Leaving a Legacy: During his record-setting career at Duke, Williams grabbed a personal-best 19 rebounds against Virginia Tech in 2005.
‘€œ[My record] is very important. My shot blocking and my rebounding record will be there for a while so I scratched  my name on the stone, so to speak. My whole career that I was there, no one had averaged a double-double and that’s something I set out to do. I was able to accomplish it in my junior and senior year.’€

There’s a Thought Process: In order to be successful, Williams educates himself on his opponents before they take the shot so he can put himself in the best position once the ball is in the air.
‘€œ[When you go in for the rebound] depends on where the shot’s been taken from. You kind of play percentages. If the ball’s on the other end of the court and I’m on the opposite block, more often than not it’s going to come off the opposite of that block. Also you’ve got to take into account the guy who’s shooting it. Has he been missing his shot? Does he tend to be short a lot of the time? Whatever the case may be, you try to think about that as well.’€

Offensive vs. Defensive: This season the Celtics have been outperformed on the offensive glass. Williams says there is a difference on both ends of the court.
‘€œDefensive rebounding, more often than not for a big, you’re already down there. Most cases you play around the block, closer to the basket. Whereas for offensive rebounding, if you’re setting a pick out there on the wing, you’ve got to run into there. Like I said, there’s a big difference because most time on defense you’re already in the paint … Any time the ball goes up I try to attack the glass. More often than not, not everybody’s attacking the glass all the time, so I try to make myself available, especially on the offensive end, to I keep the ball alive.’€

Make the Extra Effort: At 6-9, Williams still works hard to make sure he has the edge over his opponents at the basket. On this particular day of the interview, he was the last player to leave the court after practice.
‘€œ[I] just try to rebound as much as I can. I try to make the concerted effort.’€

PREVIOUS ENTRIES

Inside the Game: Paul Pierce and the Art of Versatility

Inside the Game: Kendrick Perkins on the Art of Shot-Blocking

Read More: Boston Celtics, Dennis Rodman, Duke University, inside the game
Celtics Box Score
Celtics Schedule
Celtics Headlines
Celtics Headlines
NBA Headlines