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Irish Coffee: 10 things we learned from Celtics-Heat 04.25.12 at 2:44 pm ET
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It wasn’t pretty. In fact, it was downright ugly. The end of the NBA’s lockout-shortened season is upon us, forcing TNT to broadcast marquee matchups like Ryan Hollins vs. Dexter Pittman and Sasha Pavlovic vs. Mike Miller rather than Kevin Garnett vs. Chris Bosh and Paul Pierce vs. LeBron James. But that doesn’t mean there was nothing to learn from Tuesday night’s game between the Celtics and Heat at the Garden. Here are 10 things.

10. Thanks to Pavlovic’s heroics, the Celtics still have a shot at home court advantage in the first round of the playoffs. Two things must happen Thursday: 1) Celtics defeat the Bucks, and 2) Hawks lose to the Mavericks.

“Our seeding is important as well,” said Celtics reserve guard Keyon Dooling, who scored seven points in the win over the Heat. “So, if we have to get that win, we’re coming in here trying to tear their head off.”

The hunch within the C’s organization is that if Atlanta hosts Game 1, it’ll be played on Saturday night; however, if it’s in Boston, the series will likely start Sunday. Of course, all that assumes the Bruins beat the Capitals in Game 7 and host Game 1 of the NHL Eastern Conference semifinals on Saturday.

9. After their loss, while casually dressed Heat stars Dwayne Wade and James poked fun at second-year center Dexter Pittman‘s feet and socks, teammate Chris Bosh sat in the corner of the locker room, donning a suit and reading Malcolm Gladwell‘s “Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking.” A different bird, I guess.

8. Heat swingman Shane Battier‘s take on a game that featured 39 turnovers: “In my 11 years, that’s the worst game I’ve ever witnessed. I’ve already taken a shower. You guys should all take a shower to get the stink of this game off you. It’s not fun for anybody … but, hey, it’s the NBA, you’ve got to take the good with the bad.”

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to lockout basketball. It’s FAN-tastic!

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Chris Bosh, Doc Rivers, Dwyane Wade
Doc Rivers: ‘Someone had to win the game’ at 12:45 am ET
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brightcove.createExperiences();

How do you explain a game in which you fall behind 11-0 to the No. 2 team in the East, don’t score for the first six minutes, 15 seconds, score 10 points in the first quarter on your home court (28 for the half) only to win going away by 12 points?

‘€œWell, someone had to win the game,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said of the 78-66 slopfest that Boston managed not to lose against Miami Tuesday at the Garden. “And we did, which was really nice. You know these games are still important, probably for both teams. I’€™m sure (Erik Spoelstra) is still looking at guys. We pretty much know our rotation, but someone else is always going to help you in playoffs, and games like this can give you confidence.”

With Rajon Rondo, Kevin Garnett, Mickael Pietrus, Ray Allen and Greg Stiemsma all getting the night off, Paul Pierce played just 18 minutes and scored eight points. Instead, it was Sasha Pavlovic leading the way with 16 points and Marquis Daniels adding 13 to help the Celtics to their 38th win of the season.

“That was huge for Sasha,” Rivers said. “I thought it was ‘€“ especially in the fact that Sasha really struggled in the first half and then he came in the second half and played terrific. I thought for (E’€™Twaun Moore), just playing that amount of minutes at the point-guard position was good for him. And, so, there were a lot of good things in our way for that. You know it every year: someone who plays a little bit comes in in the playoffs and has a big game for you. Marquis, again. So all those guys I thought the game was very important for.’€

It certainly wasn’t easy for Pierce.

‘€œYeah, Paul was just ‘€“ you could see he was struggling,” Rivers said. “Also struggling with spacing, too. I mean, he’€™s used to Ray and Paul and Kevin and those guys spacing the floor; he spun one time, he should’€™ve been by himself, and three of our guys were in his way. It’€™s all that.’€

Read More: Boston Celtics, Doc Rivers, Marquis Daniels, NBA
Why this was no ordinary division championship for the Celtics 04.19.12 at 10:19 am ET
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brightcove.createExperiences();

The Celtics have won the Atlantic Division in all five years of the new “Big 3″.

And it’s a well known fact that they don’t commemorate division titles with banners up above.

But when the Celtics clinched the division Wednesday with a 102-98 win over the Magic, there was reason to step back and take a bow.

It was how they got there that was impressive, especially to their coach Doc Rivers. He acknowledged the significance of the turnaround by the team, which played without the injured Rajon Rondo, Ray Allen and Mickael Pietrus.

‘€œYeah, it does, I mean [something],” Rivers said. “It’€™s funny we were kidding in the locker room because I really ‘€“ I usually, honestly, don’€™t say much about it ‘€“ I don’€™t know if I’€™ve ever congratulated the team for winning one,” But I did tell them, I said, ‘€˜Guys, I know it’€™s not a big deal to us ‘€“ and it isn’€™t because we’€™re not in this to win divisions ‘€“ but, we were two games under .500 at All-Star break and the fact that you did it and did it this early I think is very impressive.’€™ And it was.’€

Captain Paul Pierce led the Celtics Wednesday with 29 points and a career-high 14 assists. Pierce reminded everyone afterward of what the final goal is for the team, a team that was two games under .500 at the All-Star break.

“I’m not about to go pop champagne bottles or anything like that,” Pierce said. “I know they do in baseball. I mean, it is a good accomplishment. The guys should recognize where we came from to what we are today. It’s a good accomplishment I guess. But all we care about around here is a championship banner. I guess it’s just a step towards the journey we are trying to go towards.”

But Kevin Garnett took the chance to take a swipe at the naysayers who wrote the team off, giving them no chance of winning another division, let alone championship.

‘€œYou guys called us old, over,” Garnett said. “I heard some of your pathetic articles and some of your lousy announcers [predictions]. It’€™s a pity. Obviously you don’€™t know what drives us. We thank y’all for those articles, appreciate it because it lit a fire under. One of the hardest things I’€™ve always said in this league is to create chemistry.”

Read More: Boston Celtics, Doc Rivers, Kevin Garnett, Keyon Dooling
Greg Stiemsma has ‘big plans’ for Celtics playoffs at 2:56 am ET
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When the Celtics reflect on their 2011-12 season — which saw them capture a fifth Atlantic Division crown Wednesday night despite a variety of injuries throughout the campaign — they might ask themselves, “How did we pull that off?”

Sure, they benefited from a renaissance season from Kevin Garnett, enjoyed Rajon Rondo‘s streak of 23 straight games with 10 or more assists and saw a rather unexpected growth from Avery Bradley. Then there’s the ascension of Greg Stiemsma.

Stiemsma didn’t begin seeing extended playing time until the second half of the season. In January, he was buried on Doc Rivers‘ bench and only averaged just over seven minutes. That number sky-rocketed to 18 minutes in March, and then 20 in April, due to season-ending injuries to Chris Wilcox and Jermaine O’Neal.

Still, despite the uneven playing time, Stiemsma is averaging 1.56 blocks per game this season, which ranks him 15th in the entire league, and second among all rookies (The seventh overall pick in last year’s draft, Bismack Biyombo, ranks first). Not bad for a training camp invitee.

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Doc Rivers, Greg Stiemsma, Paul Pierce
Doc Rivers pays tribute to Pat Summitt at 12:22 am ET
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The questions were over and Doc Rivers was putting the wraps on another postgame press conference when he decided he wanted to say one more thing. It was about Pat Summitt, the legendary women’s basketball coach at the University of Tennessee who announced earlier in the day that she was retiring after 38 years.

Summitt, who compiled a record of 1,098-208 and won eight national championships was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease before the start of the season. “I’ve loved being the head coach at Tennessee for 38 years, but I recognize that the time has come to move into the future and to step into a new role,” Summitt said in a statement.

“I want to finish with Pat Summitt,” Rivers said as his voice faltered and his eyes became red and welled with tears. “She’€™s a neat lady. I got to know her a little bit and I just think it’€™s really sad in a lot of ways. Not basketball, but everything. So, I didn’€™t want to get emotional. I’€™m an emotional person and when you see a giant like that leave the game and leave the game because of health, it’€™s just sad. But she is responsible for women’€™s basketball. She’€™s not just a women’€™s basketball coach, she’€™s a great coach.

“The longer I’€™m in this I just realize how much coaching means to all of us. You think about it today. Pat Summitt is retiring at her age and Larry Brown is taking a job at his age. It just tells you how much it’s in your blood, how much you love it. For her not to be able to do it, to me is very sad.”

Summit is staying on at Tennessee as head coach emeritus and said she will be active in the fight against Alzheimer’s through the Pat Summitt Foundation Fund.

Read More: Doc Rivers, Pat Summitt,
After a major scare, Brandon Bass is ‘more and more comfortable’ and it shows 04.12.12 at 11:28 am ET
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brightcove.createExperiences();

The irony of the situation was just too much for Brandon Bass to fully appreciate.

With just over a minute left in overtime Wednesday night, he had just tried to box out the Hawks for a rebound on one of the best rebounding nights of the season for the Celtics.

Bass went up under the basket and landed awkwardly, laying on the ground as the Celtics came rushing over to see how he was. Doc Rivers rolled his eyes to the heavens, pleading for good fortune. He and Bass got it as it was only a temporary injury to his right knee, and not the same knee that forced him to miss two weeks in February.

“I just hyperextended my knee but I’m alright,” Bass said after an 88-86 overtime win over the Hawks. “I was blocking out and I guess I tried to jump. I don’t know what I did to be honest with you.

“I felt like a little kid. I was just scared. I didn’t know what had happened. It was hurting so bad but I think it was because I was so tensed up. Once I breathed and relaxed, everything started calming down.”

Bass could appreciate his teammates like Kevin Garnett and Rajon Rondo giving him grief while he was on the ground, trying to keep him loose and relaxed.

“They said a bunch of things. Some said I was tired. Some said I was acting and had gone Hollywood. But man, I was scared and it was hurting, too. I wasn’t going to let the team down.”

Rivers was scared, too, as he had flashbacks to his own career-changing knee injury.

‘€œWell I thought he was hurt,” Rivers said. “I’€™ve had that injury,” Rivers said of the dreaded ACL. “I don’€™t even like saying the word. And where he was grabbing. I didn’€™t think it was going to be a good thing, so that was great.

‘€œThe guys were laughing that he was exhausted and he needed some rest. I’€™m not sure what it was, actually. I’€™m not sure.’€

Bass didn’t even miss a beat – or a play for that matter. He stayed in the game and finished with 21 points and 10 rebounds in 42 massive minutes for the Celtics, who outrebounded the younger, more rested Hawks, 56-39.

“We needed a night like that to build on,” Bass said. “We had been struggling on the boards, and that’s an area we want to improve on, and we have been improving on and I just want to keep it going.”

Bass was a big reason the Celtics, playing 24 hours after an emotional battle in Miami, were able to overcome Atlanta in overtime.

“Doc just came in and laid it out and let us know, ‘No excuses tonight.’ It’s a back-to-back and everybody’s tired. He just told us to go out and fight and do what we do every night, and that’s grind,” Bass said.

Grinding is something that the Celtics loved about Bass when they traded Glen Davis to Orlando and got him in return over the summer. After 58 games this season, the Celtics are reaping the benefits of the man who has helped fill the void left by the injury to Jermaine O’Neal.

“I would say I’m getting comfortable,” Bass said. “Being with the guys, they talk to talk to me. Rondo’s out there to shoot the ball, telling me to be ready. Doc is calling plays and I feel like it’s for me. Every game I’m feeling better and more comfortable in the system. I just want to keep it going and build on it.”

Read More: Boston Celtics, Brandon Bass, Doc Rivers, Glen Davis
Irish Coffee: Do Celtics own NBA’s best defense? 04.09.12 at 2:03 pm ET
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Over their last five games, the Celtics have held the Heat, Spurs, Bulls, Pacers and 76ers — all likely playoff-bound teams — to just 80.6 points per game. That ridiculous stretch included the lowest scoring output of the Miami Thrice era and Indiana’s worst offensive game this season (both 72 points).

The point? A case can be made, rather easily, that the C’s now own the NBA’s best defense.

This recent run vaulted the Celtics to No. 1 in points allowed per 100 possessions (95.3). Their 89.3 points allowed per game still ranks third behind the only other teams that give up fewer than 90 points a night — the Sixers (88.5) and Bulls (88.9) — but that’s dropped to an NBA best 83.4 points surrendered over the past 10 games.

In fact, as colleague Paul Flannery noted, the Celtics have allowed 80 points or fewer in six of their last 12 games (including four of their last six), holding opponents to 40 percent shooting or worse in eight of those 12 contests.

For the season, the Celtics have held opponents to the league’s lowest field goal percentage (41.8%) and 3-point percentage (29.8%), both still tops in the NBA and even better over the past 10 games (38.7 FG%, 25.2 3P%). They make an offense’s life miserable everywhere on the court, ranking top-10 everywhere from at the rim (3rd) to 3-9 feet (8th) to 10-15 feet (1st) to 16-23 feet (7th) to 3-point range (1st).

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Read More: Avery Bradley, Boston Celtics, Doc Rivers, Kevin Garnett
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