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Fast Break: Celtics send Blazers to R.I.P City 03.09.12 at 9:48 pm ET
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After getting blown out by Philadelphia on Wednesday, the Celtics needed some momentum heading into their eight-game road trip. Fortunately, the Trail Blazers were in town and they brought their considerable baggage to the floor with them.

It was uncomfortable watching a team so completely unravel, but the Celtics weren’t complaining after taking a 35-point halftime lead in a 104-86. Portland had 16 turnovers in the first half, forced only two and watched time and again as various Celtics flew down the lane for layups and dunks.

At one point it was 10-10. At another it was 81-38. Paul Pierce and Ray Allen each scored 22 points and the starters shot 28-for-49.

The Celtics will start an eight-game road trip in Los Angeles against the Lakers on Sunday.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Not settling: It wasn’t clear immediately that the Blazers were in full ship be sinking mode, but the Celtics didn’t waste any time finding out. Rajon Rondo and Pierce attacked the rim right from the start and once they realized Portland wasn’t going to put up a fight, it was open season on the basket.

Sasha Pavlovic has the cure for the second quarter blues: The veteran swingman hit a 3 on the team’s first possession and then got fouled on a breakaway layup. Pavlovic scored eight points in the quarter and the Celtics scored 18 of the first 20 points. It was 45-19 after six minutes and 38-13 for the quarter.

Save those legs: Kevin Garnett made all five of his shots and played just 20 minutes. Allen, Pierce and Rondo clocked in with just 26 apiece. They needed that.

Bench production: Avery Bradley scored 10 points and had five assists. Greg Stiemsma missed all nine shots he took, but he had seven rebounds, three steals and two blocks. Pavlovic added 10 points and it was the bench’s best performance in weeks, even without Mickael Pietrus (knee) and Chris Wilcox (personal reasons).

WHAT WENT WRONG

Injuries, again: Pietrus has struggled with his shot lately, but coach Doc Rivers revealed before the game that his problems are related to a knee injury. Pietrus tried to play through it on Wednesday against Philly and Rivers acknowledged before Friday’s game that he would have liked to have had that back. The hope is that Pietrus will be available for Sunday’s game against the Lakers, but that’s far from given.

Read More: Blazers, Celtics, Fast Break,
Fast Break: Celtics complete sweep of Knicks 04.24.11 at 6:16 pm ET
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(Click here for Rajon Rondo post-game interview)

NEW YORK — Bring on the Heat. It got more hectic than it should have in the fourth quarter as the Celtics almost blew a 23-point lead, but all that matters is that they survived in Game 4 of their first round playoff series and escaped with a 101-89 win over the Knicks on Sunday.

The win completed the sweep, their first since the 1992 season when they brushed off the Pacers in three games. It also allowed them at least a week worth of rest before they start their semifinal series with Miami (assuming the Heat take care of Philadelphia).

The Knicks series is over. Every game except for the third one had its anxious moments, but the Celtics did what that they had to do and made progress along the way. Here’s how they closed it out:

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Rondo at his best: Knicks coach Mike D’Antoni raised eyebrows before the game when he wondered aloud how Rajon Rondo would look if he played for Minnesota, instead of on a team with three future Hall of Famers. No doubt word was relayed to Rondo about the subtle jab, but whether it bothers him or not is a different story. “He doesn’t bring it up a lot,” Doc Rivers said in response. “It probably does in some way, it would bother anyone in some way and it’s probably good for him. Keep doing it. If it’s going to make him play like this, I’m all for it.”

Whatever the case, Rondo went right at the Knicks from the outset. He went strong to the basket even when he didn’t have the numbers and made solid decisions with the ball. He also pulled up for jumpers in transition and drained team. How would Rondo do with a bad team? It doesn’t really matter because he’s the right point guard for this team.

The bench comes alive: For three games the Celtics played shorthanded. Their second unit was no unit at all, but in Game 4 that all changed. Glen Davis made four of his first five shots and put up 12 points and five rebounds in the first half. Nenad Krstic scored inside — his first made field goals of the playoffs. Delonte West brought his usual tough defense and Jeff Green was aggressive on the post and putting the ball on the floor. The Celtics had a six-point lead after the first quarter. They led by 17 at the half. Credit the bench, which will be a major part of the next rounds of the playoffs.

The second half? Not so much, but at long last the play of the second unit was a positive development.

De-fense, De-fense: In the building where the chant took on a life of its own, the Celtics clamped down defensively in an impressive, and overwhelming, performance. Carmelo Anthony started hot, making five of his first nine shots, but he was the only threat and the Celtics eventually cooled him off too. Amar’e Stoudemire was clearly not himself, missing his first eight shots. Outside of Anthony, the Knicks shot a woeful 6-for-34 in the first half. Even with him they still made just 28 percent in the first half.

And then the second half happened …

WHAT WENT WRONG

Third quarter letdown: It was bound to happen. After dominating the first half and taking that into the opening minutes of the second half, the Celtics displayed every bad habit that has marked the last two months of the regular season. They held the ball on offense, didn’t get back in transition and didn’t close out on shooters. The Knicks sliced an 18-point lead down to 10 and made the fourth quarter way more interesting than it needed to be.

Careless turnovers: These are the Celtics we’re talking about. Turnovers have been a problem forever with this team and they reared their head in the fourth quarter. Really they were a function of all the bad offensive habits the Celtics developed late in the year — holding the ball, waiting too long to get into their sets. They may be playing with an extra sense of urgency during the playoffs, but teams simply don’t become something they’re not overnight and the Celtics’ turnover problem will not go away any time soon.

Read More: Celtics, Fast Break, game 4, Knicks
Fast Break: Celtics ‘play well,’ roll the Knicks in Game 3 04.22.11 at 9:36 pm ET
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Kevin Garnett and the Celtics got the better of Amar'e Stoudemire and the Knicks Friday night. (AP)

For the last three days all the Celtics have been saying is that they have to play better. Their lead on the Knicks in their first round playoff series was great, but they knew they got away with uneven performances in both games. New York had something to do with that too, especially some of their role players who played above their heads, to say nothing of the tremendous individual performances by Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire.

But the Celtics believed that the close games had more to do with their inconsistencies. “I just want us to play well,” Doc Rivers said prior to tip-off. “[If] we play well, we will see what happens.”

They played well in Game 3. They played perhaps their best playoff game since Game 5 in Cleveland last year when they silenced LeBron James and the Cavaliers and kickstarted their run to the NBA finals. The feeling inside Madison Square Garden was eerily reminiscent. A hopped up crowd was stunned to silence early and when the Knicks tried to make a run early in the second half, the Celtics went into kill mode.

The result was a 113-96 blowout that gave them a commanding 3-0 lead. This is what the Celtics look like when they play well.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

What’s better than a great start? What the Celtics did: The pregame chatter was all about the Knicks riding the energy of the first home playoff game in seven years to a quick start. Instead it was the Celtics who established the early pace. They led 22-5, their biggest lead of the series and got center Ronny Turiaf in early foul trouble. Coming into another team’s arena and taking the crowd out of the game has always been a point of pride for the Celtics. “If you want to bother us, tell no one to come,” Doc Rivers said an hour before tipoff. “That will freak us out.”

Paul Pierce was locked in: In another quiet Celtics locker room before the game, Paul Pierce saw a couple of players engaged in small talk with a couple of reporters. “None of that,” Pierce said quietly but forcefully. He wasn’t kidding. Pierce was in his own world, all business, and he played like it, scoring 14 points in the first quarter. He took over at various times and seemed to make every big shot whenever the Knicks threatened to make a run. Ray Allen was phenomenal. Rajon Rondo had a triple double and 20 assists , but this was Pierce’s game.

The Celtics owned the 3-point line: Late in the season, the Celtics game from behind the arc went missing. It looks like they found it. Allen knocked down 8 of 11 and now has made an incredible 15-for-20 in the series. Pierce added six more and the Celtics made 14 3′s, which was a season high. They obviously won’t shoot this well again, but their success from behind the arc is a good sign for a team that has been fighting to recapture its offensive identity.

WHAT WENT WRONG

The bench was better, but still ineffective as a group: First, the bad news. The Celtics big first quarter lead evaporated as soon as Rivers went to his bench. Like clockwork it seems these days. But there was a glimmer when the second unit was able to keep the lead at five points. Not great, but it was something. There was some honest to goodness good stuff too. Jeff Green finally provided some offensive punch scoring seven first half points. But the backups have to start playing better soon.

Too many turnovers: This is nitpicking considering how well the Celtics played, but they once again turned the ball over too much. Considering the score and the way they cleaned up their work on the defensive glass, it’s perhaps asking too much for them to play a perfect game, but the turnover problem has been an issue.

Read More: Celtics, Fast Break, Game 3, Knicks
Fast Break: Celtics end season with win 04.13.11 at 10:17 pm ET
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This wasn’t so much a game as it was an exhibition contest. With Game 1 of their first round playoff series scheduled to tip Sunday night at TD Garden, the Celtics and Knicks elected to sit most of their key players with Amar’e Stoudemire being the lone exception. Doc Rivers elected to not play Rajon Rondo, Ray Allen, Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Jermaine O’Neal, Shaquille O’Neal and Delonte West, leaving him just eight players.

Those eight contributed to an oddly entertaining 112-102 win over New York, giving the Celtics a season sweep of the series.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Avery Bradley, stand up: The rookie guard’s previous career high was just five points and it’s been his struggles offensively that have limited his ability to help the Celtics much on the court. But Bradley was the aggressor on Wednesday. Seconds after he checked into the game, he stripped Anthony Carter in the backcourt and soared in for a dunk. He finished with 20 points in what was easily his best performance of the season.

Sasha Pavlovic showed some offensive punch: There may be a spot for Pavlovic as an 11th or 12 man in the playoffs and he scored 19 points in a surprisingly efficient offensive game.

Troy Murphy showed signs of life: Murphy has done little to make a case for any kind of a meaningful postseason role, but he scored nine points in the fourth quarter and finally made his first 3-pointer as a member of the Celtics.

Read More: Celtics, Fast Break, Knicks,
Fast Break: Celtics get gored in Chicago 04.07.11 at 10:38 pm ET
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If there was a statement to be made in Thursday night’s game between the Bulls and Celtics, it’s that Boston can’t expect to come in to Chicago and play its C+ game and come away with anything but a double-digit loss. The Bulls defense can make anyone look bad, but the Celtics didn’t help the cause by missing layups and failing to do anything in transition. Defensively, they were a step slow in closing out on shooters and allowed the Bulls hit over 40 percent from 3-point range, in a 97-81 loss.

And in the much-anticipated point guard battle between Derrick Rose and Rajon Rondo, Rose won by an early TKO. He then poured it on, going for 30 points and 8 assists to Rondo’s 7 and 6.

While still technically alive, the race for homecourt is over … and in reality it has been ever since the Celtics dropped winnable games at home against the Grizzlies and Bobcats two weeks ago. They are now tied with the Heat for second place with Sunday’s showdown looming in Miami.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Derrick Rose happened: The likely MVP put on a clinic in the first, scoring from impossible angles and running past the Celtics defense in transition. When he wasn’t scoring, Rose was breaking down the Celtics defense and allowing lanes for offensive rebounds. He completely outplayed Rondo in the first half, outscoring him 16-0.

Offensive execution: Where was it? The Bulls are the best defensive team in the league, but the Celtics played right into their hands by turning down decent looks and having to force contested jump shots late in the shot clock. Outside of a brief stretch in the third quarter, there were also no fast break points to be had.

Pick a player: Ray Allen couldn’t get on track. Paul Pierce forced the issue and had several bad turnovers. Kevin Garnett had an off-night shooting. Glen Davis was 1-for-8. Rondo missed layups, among other problems. There was no one among the Celtics main players who had anything close to a good night.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

The second unit had its moments: Doc Rivers finally has the right personnel in place to have a functioning second unit and while he’s still toying with the right combinations, the offensive punch provided by Jeff Green and Nenad Krstic off the bench is a welcome sight. The Celtics posted up Green on several occasions with generally positive results and that helped erase an eight-point lead in the first half. Unfortunately for the Celtics, they couldn’t duplicate that performance in the second half.

Free throw shooting: It’s the simplest thing in the world, but the Celtics were able to stay in the game by going a perfect 10-for-10 in the first half at the line, while also getting Luol Deng in foul trouble. That was about all they had going for them offensively.

Read More: Bulls, Celtics, Fast Break,
Fast Break: Complete C’s take apart Sixers 04.05.11 at 9:49 pm ET
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The Celtics and Sixers met Tuesday night in what was very likely a playoff preview. The Celtics won an entertaining game, 99-82, which allowed them to slip back into a tie with the Heat for second place in the Eastern Conference. If these two teams do meet in the playoffs, don’t expect a free-flowing game like they played in the first half.

The Celtics were finally able to put together a complete game after locking down on defense and running away with it in the fourth quarter. Good signs all around for the C’s.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Rajon Rondo is back: Doc Rivers was asked before the game if he thought his point guard had turned the corner. Rivers answered emphatically that he thought that was the case. Rondo started slowly against the Sixers and allowed his counterpart Jrue Holliday to get off quickly with 11 points in the first quarter. But Rondo changed course and finished the first half with 12 points and nine assists. He also drove to the basket at will and finished at the rim en route to a 16-point, 13-assist performance. Holiday meanwhile finished with just those 11 points.

Jermaine O’Neal as a starter: Rivers made the decision to keep O’Neal in the starting lineup and have Nenad Krstic come off the bench. His rationale is that Krstic will assume a reserve role in the playoffs, no matter which of the O’Neals is starting. Jermaine O’Neal offers a stronger defensive presence at the beginning of games and Krstic could fit nicely with Glen Davis and Jeff Green in a rotation. O’Neal had his strongest game since his return with nine points and three rebounds, while Krstic had eight points and six rebounds. That’s a good night from the centers.

Kevin Garnett is ready: If there is one huge difference between this year’s Celtics team and last, it’s that there is no question that Garnett is healthy and ready for the playoffs. He started the game by going into the post twice and took five shots in the first four and a half minutes. Garnett has been the Celtics most consistent players since the All-Star break and that is a major difference as they head into the postseason.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Defense takes a break: The Celtics allowed 50 points and 50 percent shooting in the first half. They allowed 32 in the second half. It’s been a while since they locked down like that in the second half.

Jeff Green with an up and down night: Green had only one shot through the first three quarters. In the fourth, the Celtics made a concerted effort to get him going as he played in a lineup with Delonte West, Ray Allen, Davis and Krstic. That’s a good fit for him as he can be the featured offensive player in that group and he wound up with eight points, seven rebounds and a couple of highlight-level plays.

Ray Allen still needs more shots: Allen played an invaluable role with the reserve units in the rotation, but he had only seven shots. Allen made five of them and finished with 13 points, which speaks to his efficiency. He also oddly missed two free throws on illegal defense technicals. He had made 44 of his last 45 free throws coming into the game.

Read More: 76ers, Celtics, Fast Break,
Fast Break: Celtics win but lose Shaquille O’Neal (again) 04.03.11 at 8:22 pm ET
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The pregame optimism that hovered around the Celtics disappeared early in the first half when Shaquille O’Neal limped off the court with what the team is calling a strained right calf. Shaq didn’t return and there was no further update provided. His future is uncertain at best. The good news for the Celtics is that Nenad Krstic‘s knee injury is much less serious than first feared and there’s a chance he can return by Tuesday.

As for the game, the Celtics got a much-needed 101-90 win over Detroit to stay tied with Miami in the loss column for second place in the East. They built a double-digit lead in the second half and had some anxious moments, but were able to hold off a Detroit team that is playing out the string.

WHAT WENT RIGHT

Nenad Krstic will be back soon: The best news the Celtics received over the weekend is that Krstic suffered a bone bruise and didn’t do any further damage to his right knee. Krstic said that he hoped to return to the lineup on Tuesday when the Celtics host the 76ers. He has some pain in his knee and there is swelling, but all things considered this couldn’t have worked out better for him or the team.

Three of the big four isn’t bad: Paul Pierce scored 22 points, Kevin Garnett had 23 points and eight rebounds and Rajon Rondo dished out 14 assists. Now the Celtics just need to get Ray Allen going. They ran their first play for him and he got a wide-open jumper, but Allen later collided with Rip Hamilton and had to leave the game early in the first quarter. He finished with 13 points, but on just six shots.

Delonte West is doing everything the Celtics hoped he would: Delonte West had a lot of expectations to live up to when he returned from his wrist and ankle injuries, but he’s surpassed them most nights. West had one of his better all-around games with 10 points and five assists, while playing the kind of strong defense at two positions the Celtics desperately need.

WHAT WENT WRONG

Shaquille O’Neal’s return didn’t last long: For five minutes of the first quarter, Shaquille O’Neal was back on the court and all was well. But when he pulled up lame at midcourt and hobbled off, the Celtics were right back where they started in regards to the Big Fella. The team is calling a strained right calf.

Too many turnovers: The Celtics shot 62 percent in the first half and held the Pistons to 41 percent shooting, but they had only a one-point lead. The problem was too many turnovers. They had 11 in the half and seven in the second quarter alone. That kept the Pistons in the game.

Read More: Celtics, Fast Break, Pistons,
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