Green Street
NEED TO KNOW
Don't forget to follow Ben on Twitter.
A WEEI.com Celtics Blog
WEEI.com Blog Network
Posts related to ‘Jae Crowder’
Avery Bradley named NBA all-defensive first team, Jae Crowder, Marcus Smart honorable mention 05.25.16 at 5:22 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Avery Bradley named NBA all-defensive first team, Jae Crowder, Marcus Smart honorable mention

Avery Bradley

Avery Bradley

The Celtics had a very good season and a good part of it was based on their improved defensive effort. 

Avery Bradley led that effort as a starter and, on Wednesday, was named to the NBA’s all-defensive first team by pro basketball media members.

Behind Bradley, the Celtics finished tied with the Clippers and Warriors for fourth in the NBA in defensive rating. Bradley was also the top finisher among guards in the Kia NBA Defensive Player of the Year voting (sixth place overall). He averaged a career-high 1.54 steals for the Celtics in their breakout 48-win season under third-year coach Brad Stevens. 

Jae Crowder just missed a selection on the second team, finishing with 47 points, including three first-team votes. Marcus Smart, who often played alongside Bradley in the backcourt, finished with seven points and two first-team votes. 

Kawhi Leonard of the Spurs won the Kia NBA Defensive Player of the Year award and finished with the most votes. 

2015-16 NBA ALL-DEFENSIVE FIRST TEAM

Player (Team), 1st Team Votes, 2nd Team Votes, Total

Kawhi Leonard (San Antonio), 130, –, 260

Draymond Green (Golden State), 123, 5, 251

DeAndre Jordan (L.A. Clippers), 47, 43, 137

Avery Bradley (Boston), 62, 25, 149

Chris Paul (L.A. Clippers), 59, 30, 148

2015-16 NBA ALL-DEFENSIVE SECOND TEAM

Player (Team), 1st Team Votes, 2nd Team Votes, Total

Paul Millsap (Atlanta), 11, 75, 97

Paul George (Indiana), 5 , 38, 48

Hassan Whiteside (Miami), 44, 38, 126

Tony Allen (Memphis), 44, 33, 121

Jimmy Butler (Chicago), 18, 26 , 62

Read More: Avery Bradley, Boston Celtics, Jae Crowder, Kawhi Leonard
Danny Ainge on Kelly Olynyk: ‘Surgery is an option,’ no surgery on Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Avery Bradley 05.04.16 at 3:37 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Danny Ainge on Kelly Olynyk: ‘Surgery is an option,’ no surgery on Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Avery Bradley

Kelly Olynyk

Kelly Olynyk

WALTHAM — Turns out Kelly Olynyk may need surgery after all to fix a shoulder that never fully healed after an injury that slowed his season. 

On Feb. 10 at TD Garden, he injured his shoulder in a collision against the Clippers in the first half. It was partially separated but began to heal after a 14-game absence. 

But upon his return he never fully regained the form that produced the most effective 3-point shooter on the team at 41 percent. He did help lengthen the Celtics bench and the spacing on the court but when he re-injured the same shoulder in Game 1 against the Hawks, he was reduced to a small bit player off the bench, missing Games 2 and 3 and playing sparingly in the final three games of the series. 

“Kelly is still deciding what to do with our medical staff and with the opinions that he’s received,” Danny Ainge said Wednesday. “We should know within the next week or so of what that decision will be, but surgery is an option and it is being discussed. He’ll make that decision soon.” 

As for other injured Celtics at the end of the season, Ainge said none will require surgery. Jae Crowder (right ankle), Isaiah Thomas (left wrist) and Avery Bradley (right hamstring) should all be back to full strength with rest and rehab. 

“Jae’s is a bone bruise in the foot,” Ainge said. “Some things just linger. He’ll be OK. Same with Isaiah, same with everybody else. I think the only surgery possibility is Kelly’s shoulder.”

Ainge made it clear that Bradley almost certainly would not have been able to return to the Atlanta series, simply because the team did not want to risk future injury. And returning soon after that was a “long shot” as well. 

“I think that first of all, the hamstring injury Avery had, a Grade 1 strain, it’s risky,” Ainge said. “You want to be really careful with that because if you get a second hamstring injury then they sort of have a tendency to linger throughout your career. So we probably wouldn’t have let Avery go back out unless he was just 100 percent and felt absolutely nothing. But I think that was always a long shot.”

Read More: Avery Bradley, Boston Celtics, Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder
Jae Crowder: Series loss ‘will drive me to be a different player’ 04.29.16 at 1:27 am ET
By   |  Comments Off on Jae Crowder: Series loss ‘will drive me to be a different player’

Apr 28, 2016; Boston, MA, USA; Boston Celtics forward Jae Crowder (center) shoots the ball against Atlanta Hawks forward Thabo Sefolosha (left) and forward Paul Millsap (right) during the first half in game six of the first round of the NBA Playoffs at TD Garden. Mandatory Credit: Mark L. Baer-USA TODAY Sports

Celtics forward Jae Crowder was overmatched all series by the Atlanta bigs. (Mark L. Baer/USA Today Sports)

For the first 66 games of the season, Jae Crowder was the second-most important player on the Celtics. 

Then he turned his right ankle against the Rockets on March 11 and wasn’t the same the rest of the way, playing with an ankle he said was really never better than 70 percent. 

Crowder could never consistently get his shot to fall when Isaiah Thomas was double- and triple-teamed, and his ankle prevented him from driving and cutting to the basket the way he did when he was healthy. In Thursday’s season-ending Game 6 loss to the Hawks, Crowder missed his first six shots and was 2-for-9 at the half. He finished 5-for-15 for 15 points in the 104-92 setback.

“Yeah, it was a very tough stretch for me,” Crowder said. “But I’m not here to make any excuses about that, it was just tough, it was a tough series for me, but my teammates never stopped believing in me. I just tried to get through it. … I gave it my best, so I can sleep good knowing that I gave it my all.”

In the series, he wasn’t the same forward who was a legitimate threat when Thomas was drawing attention early in the season. And he could never get comfortable against the Atlanta front court of Paul Millsap, Kent Bazemore and Al Horford.  

“It will drive me to work harder, for sure,” Crowder said. “It will drive me to be a different player than I am today, so we use it as motivation to move on.

“Like I just told Isaiah, we’ve just got to keep chipping at it, keep getting better, of course its only going to be one team to have a successful year and that’s when you hold that trophy up. So until we do that, its not a successful season. We are going to keep building, keep working.”

As for the futures of Evan Turner and Jared Sullinger and breaking up some of the chemistry on the team, Crowder will leave personnel decisions to Danny Ainge. 

“That’s what sucks about it, but like Isaiah said, it’s a part of the business, but we did build a bond with each and every guy in the locker room and it was fun,” Crowder said. “We just tried to have fun each and every night. When we have a locker room that’s bonded like the way we do and have fun you never want to see it end, and it was tough to see it end.”

Read More: 2016 NBA playoffs, Boston Celtics, Jae Crowder,
Jae Crowder heads back to gym after Game 3 to work on shot: ‘I wanted to see the ball go through the basket’ 04.23.16 at 5:40 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Jae Crowder heads back to gym after Game 3 to work on shot: ‘I wanted to see the ball go through the basket’

Celtics forward Jae Crowder (99) works for the ball against Atlanta Hawks guard Jeff Teague (0) in Game 3. (David Butler II/USA Today Sports)

Celtics forward Jae Crowder (99) works for the ball against Atlanta Hawks guard Jeff Teague (0) in Game 3. (David Butler II/USA Today Sports)

WALTHAM  –  Jae Crowder had seen enough of his shots not falling through the basket after going 1-for-11 from the field Friday night. Crowder has made exactly two shots in his last 20 attempts covering Games 2 and 3. He is is just 7-for-36 overall in the series, including 3-for-17 from 3-point range. 

So, instead of going home to rest and savor his defense on Al Horford and Paul Millsap in a 111-103 Game 3 win, he went back to the Celtics training facility to shoot. 

“I wanted to see the ball go through the basket, that’s all,” Crowder said Saturday. “I was here 45 minutes, me and my friend, I needed a rebounder. I’ve done it a few times.”

Then he had a question for the reporters on hand. 

“How’d you find out last night and not the previous nights?” 

Told that teammate Isaiah Thomas was the one dropping dimes, Crowder seemed at ease. 

“Oh, Ok, I got here like 1, 1:30 [Saturday morning],” Crowder said. “The win was great. I was very happy with that, but I wanted to prepare myself for Game 4. It’s a big game for us, and I wanted to really step into my shots and be a force in my offensive game. I’m doing great on defense and guys are still applauding me on that, but I just want to lift our team up a little more in the offensive end. I just wanted to see the ball go through the hoop.”

“It’s a big reason why we’re here, that these guys have that kind of mindset and that kind of work ethic,” coach Brad Stevens said. “I think the general collective chip on our shoulder is pretty good. But I think individually each of these guys has a reason to have a chip on their shoulder. And Jae’s a worker, and always has been.”

Thomas said it’s just a matter of time before the shots start falling, and there’s no time like Game 4. 

“We haven’t [seen him struggle like this]. But he’s so positive. We’re so positive with him,” Thomas said. “We’re confident in his ability to score the basketball and to help us like he has all year. Once he gets going, it’s going to be scary. He was in here last night [after the game] getting shots up. He’s hard on himself but at the same time, he’s taking the right shots. The basketball gods will help him out soon.”

Maybe the basketball gods will help with Crowder’s bad right ankle, and ankle Crowder says is still at only 70 percent. 

“I don’t plan on changing it. I’m shooting the same way. I’m trying to play with the ankle and learn to adapt to it as much as possible, but that’s what helps me to come back in the gym and stay late,” Crowder said. “That will help me to adjust, but I’m not thinking about it. I’m going to let it fly. I’ve put a lot of work into it. I’m not worried. I’m shooting, working out, doing my same thing.

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2016 NBA playoffs, Atlanta Hawks, Boston Celtics, Jae Crowder
Thomas, Celtics working on not losing their cool in Game 4: ‘You’ve just got to be smart about whatever you do’ at 5:11 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Thomas, Celtics working on not losing their cool in Game 4: ‘You’ve just got to be smart about whatever you do’

Celtics guard Marcus Smart (36) blocks the shot of Hawks center Al Horford (15). (David Butler II/USA Today Sports)

Celtics guard Marcus Smart (36) blocks the shot of Hawks center Al Horford (15). (David Butler II/USA Today Sports)

WALTHAM – With so much on the line, now is not the time for false bravado or acting like a tough guy. Or flopping like one. 

The Celtics were reminded of this Saturday morning before they got together for film session and a light walkthrough at their practice facility in Waltham. 

The intensity level picked up Friday night during Game 3. When Jae Crowder was drilled by Jeff Teague in the first quarter and the officials deemed it to be a “common foul,” Crowder said the officials opened the door for chippy play to escalate. 

“I told them that hard foul on me by Teague set the tone, I feel like,” Crowder said Saturday. “If you’re going to call that a Flagrant 1, then we know how far we can go. That’s when they tried to change it and called Flagrant 1s and things like that. I told the ref, you set the tone, I hope you realize that, and that’s when it got chippy. It’s just part of it, and the refs have to realize that. That’s for the players. We realize that sets the tone.”

The tone produced three ‘Flagrant 1’ fouls in Game 3, all in the second half. The Hawks committed two, Paul Millsap and Dennis Schroder while Jared Sullinger was called for one in the third. That doesn’t include the double-technical that preceded the Thomas arm to the face of Schroder with 1:27 left in the first quarter. 

“Both teams are trying to win the game,” Thomas said. “You’ve just got to be smart about whatever you do but knowing that it’s playoff basketball and things are going to happen and it is going to get a little chippy. You’ve got to hold your composure and do what it takes to win. I’m just out there fighting and trying to get my team wins.”

“We’ve reminded, we talk about that stuff and everything else,” Brad Stevens said after practice Saturday. “But I think, at the end of the day, there’s such a fine line between hard real good competition and crossing that line and you just gotta do your best to compete at that physical level necessary to have success. And, obviously, hey, they deemed that he had crossed the line by giving him a flagrant-1 and it is what is and now we move forward. We’ve got to focus our attention on the Hawks.

“When you’re playing a team for the fourth time and they’re all competitive guys on both sides of the ball, they’re all good players, they’re all tough guys. I trust that nothing like that would ever go over the line. But it’s hard for me to predict that but it’s not something that we talk about, it’s not something that they talk about. Obviously, it’s a competitive game and sometimes when there’s a competitive game with a scoreboard and a crowd and everything else, emotions get involved. But you hope that nothing like that ever happens that obviously isn’t good for the game.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2016 NBA playoffs, Atlanta Hawks, Boston Celtics, Brad Stevens
Kelly Olynyk dealing with ‘pain, discomfort’ heading into Game 2, Jae Crowder ‘not 100’ percent 04.18.16 at 4:16 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on Kelly Olynyk dealing with ‘pain, discomfort’ heading into Game 2, Jae Crowder ‘not 100’ percent

Hawks forward Paul Millsap (4) drives to the basket against Boston Celtics center Kelly Olynyk (41) and forward Amir Johnson (90) during the second half in game one of the first round of the NBA Playoffs at Philips Arena. (John David Mercer-USA Today Sports)

Hawks forward Paul Millsap drives to the basket past Celtics forward Kelly Olynyk during the second half of Saturday’s game. (John David Mercer/USA Today Sports)

Suddenly, the Celtics’ injury woes go well beyond Avery Bradley.

There are a number of uncertainties regarding the availabilities of the Celtics heading into Game 2 in Atlanta. 

Aside from Bradley, who has been ruled out by Brad Stevens for Tuesday night, the most troubling might be the status of the C’s best 3-point shooter, Kelly Olynyk. The 7-footer re-aggravated the same (shooting) shoulder he injured on Feb. 10 against the Clippers. He missed 12 games after the All-Star break. 

Olynyk missed his second straight practice Monday and is questionable for Tuesday. 

“Got the impression he got aggravated the other day and he’s been dealing with it for a while, obviously, since the [initial] injury,” Stevens said. “So he’s going to sit out today and we’ll see about [Tuesday] night.”

If Olynyk can’t go, the Celtics would be without two of their top three perimeter shooters in Bradley and Olynyk. 

“We’ll see. Hopefully. Probably just rest it today, see how it goes,” Olynyk said. “Just sore, pain, discomfort. I’m just trying to get it back.”

Olynyk told reporters Monday at Philips Arena he doesn’t recall exactly when he injured the shoulder but believes it happened sometime during the Game 1 loss. 

“During the game you could definitely tell something wasn’t the same as it was for the start,” Olynyk said. “Hopefully just a little rest and recovery and get back out there.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Read More: 2016 NBA playoffs, Atlanta Hawks, Avery Bradley, Boston Celtics
The making of Jae Crowder, on and off the court, from Sam Packard 04.16.16 at 6:45 pm ET
By   |  Comments Off on The making of Jae Crowder, on and off the court, from Sam Packard

Sam Packard interviews Celtics forward Jae Crowder about his path to the NBA and how he overcame being short and chunky as a junior in high school. Sam also talks to Jae’s high school basketball coach, both of his junior college coaches, as well as the man who recruited him to Marquette. Towards the end of the episode, Sam and Jae discuss what its like to play under Brad Stevens, the first time he realized Isaiah Thomas was great, and the his amazing nickname Bae Crowder.

Read More: Bae Crowder, Boston Celtics, Jae Crowder,
Celtics Headlines
NBA Headlines