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Why you should care about Wednesday’s Celtics win: Marcus Smart had his best game, Jared Sullinger can rebound 10.22.14 at 10:09 pm ET
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Marcus Smart

Marcus Smart

The Celtics wrapped up the preseason with a 100-86 victory over the Nets at the TD Garden on Wednesday night (check out the box score here). Brooklyn rested its starters, while Rajon Rondo was out once again with a broken left hand for the Celtics.

Brad Stevens only played starters Jeff Green and Avery Bradley in the first quarter, while Marcus Smart and Jared Sullinger shined in their final tune up before the regular season.

Here are other reasons why you should have cared about the Celtics‘ preseason finale:

Marcus Smart had a very strong showing back in the starting point guard role

Smart opened up the game by swishing a 3-pointer out of the corner, which was nice for Celtics fans to see since shooting is one of his biggest weaknesses. However, Smart did a much better job of slashing through the lane than he has in previous games. He was able to connect on three layups in traffic, while also going 4-for-4 from the free throw line. Attacking the basket might be Smart’€™s biggest strength, so it was certainly positive to see him do so efficiently before the preseason came to an end.

Smart never saw the floor in the second half, but the damage was done. He racked up 16 points in just 15 minutes of action, adding four assists, a rebound and two steals. Perhaps most importantly, he did it on 5-for-8 shooting from the field — all three of his misses coming from downtown. Good things happen when Smart gets into the paint.

Jared Sullinger was a beast on the boards once again

Sullinger is a very good scorer, but he is a phenomenal rebounder. After ripping down 19 boards on Sunday, Sullinger grabbed 13 in the first half alone Wednesday. He finished the game with what is becoming a classic Sullinger stat line — 15 points and 17 rebounds. Sullinger did so while shooting 7-for-10 from the field in 26 minutes of action.

James Young returned from a hamstring injury

Young hurt his hamstring while warming up for the first preseason game, but kept that information to himself and ended up by playing in the game. Young posted 10 points in his debut, but then has missed each preseason contest since. He also didn’t play in a summer league game following a car crash.

The rookie wasted no time Wednesday, nailing a 3-pointer on his first possession in the game. He finished with just five points and four rebounds, but keep in mind it was just his second professional game. Young has plenty of room to grow this season.

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Read More: Brooklyn Nets, Jared Sullinger, Marcus Smart, Rajon Rondo
Is Celtics’ Marcus Smart really this bad a shooter? 10.13.14 at 1:48 pm ET
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Marcus Smart

Marcus Smart

If you’re one of the many folks still ripping Rajon Rondo and Avery Bradley‘s perimeter shooting, wait until you get a load of Celtics rookie Marcus Smart.

Following a trend that’s been in decline since his days at appropriately named Marcus High in Flower Mound, Texas, Smart is attempting a higher rate of his shots from distance, even as his 3-point percentage progressively worsens.

Let’s take a look at Smart’s shooting percentages from inside the 3-point line — where he’s an exceptional finisher at the rim and gets to the free throw line with tremendous effectiveness — and beyond it since his junior year of high school.

2010-11 (high school junior): 176-292 2P (.603), 29-84 3P (.345)
2011-12 (high school senior): 143-216 2P (.577), 41-110 3P (.372)
2012-13 (Oklahoma State freshman): 113-243 2P (.465), 38-131 3P (.290)
2013-14 (Oklahoma State sophomore): 114-222 2P (.514), 49-164 3P (.299)
2014-15 (summer league/preseason): 14-41 2P (.342), 13-56 3P (.232)

At the prep level, Smart could get to the rim with ease, but his 6-foot-4, 226-pound frame becomes less of an advantage as the competition level rises. Likewise, scouting plays an increased role at each stage, and defenses are designed to encourage Smart’s shooting while discouraging his penetration.

As a result, the Celtics rookie’s long-distance attempts have increased from 27.6 percent of his total shots in high school to 38.8 percent in college and now 57.7 percent in nine games of summer league and preseason action. Granted, that’s a limited sample size in the NBA — where the 3-point distance is greater and he may be attempting more exhibition 3’s to adjust — but Smart’s excessive poor 3-point shooting remains a concern.

As usual, DraftExpress did a nice job of breaking down Smart’s catch-and-shoot struggles at Oklahoma State, where he was just as bad — if not worse — from mid-range as he was from 3, per shotanalytics.com.

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Marcus Smart, NBA,
Why You Should Care About Wednesday’s Celtics Win: Jared Sullinger, Marcus Smart stand out 10.08.14 at 10:27 pm ET
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Jared Sullinger

Jared Sullinger

HARTFORD — The Boston Celtics beat the New York Knicks 106-86 Wednesday night at Hartford’s XL Center in Hartford (see box score here). With few standout individual performances beyond Jared Sullinger’s 23 points on 12 shots, the real star of Thursday night’€™s game was the Celtics‘ team defense.

The Celtics played  aggressive,  jumping in passing lanes and contesting jump shots. They finished with x14 steals and held the Knicks to 40 percent shooting.

The young Celtics guards, especially Marcus Smart and Avery Bradley, played at a frantic pace, leading to a number of scoring opportunities in transition. And the Knicks did not do themselves any favors, as they committed 28 turnovers.

Self-proclaimed underrated supserstar Carmelo Anthony also struggled, scoring just 10 points on 3-of-9 shooting from the field opposite Evan Turner.

OTHER REASONS TO CARE AOBUT CELTICS-KNICKS:

Marcus Smart made a shot!

Four, actually. After an 0-for during his NBA debut, Smart scored 11 points on 4-of-8 shooting. He scored 10 points, including a pair of 3-pointers, in the second quarter. Smart, who normally looks to attack the basket, showed no hesitation taking jump shots. He also looked adept at running the offense, leading the team with six assists.

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Jared Sullinger, Marcus Smart, New York Knicks
Why you should care about Monday’s Celtics game: Marcus Smart, James Young debut; Evan Turner shines 10.06.14 at 10:29 pm ET
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As if the start of basketball season starting up wasn’t reason enough for you to care about the Celtics‘ preseason opener on Monday night, then Marcus Smart and James Young making their NBA debuts — and leading the Celtics to an easy 98-78 victory over the 76ers — should be. (See the box score here.)

Smart spoke before the game about being nervous: “Of course, [there's] always nerves,” he said. “First game at a different level, there’s always going to be nerves, but [I've] just got to figure out how to calm them down.”

His nerves were evident as he finished with just two points (0-8 FGs). Despite not shooting the ball particularly well, his effort on both ends of the floor was unmatched. He played lockdown defense on each and every possession coming up with three steals in the process. Although his shots weren’t falling, Smart did a good job running the offense, particularly leading the fast break. He ended up with six assists in his 27 minutes.

Young began the game cold, and his nerves were perhaps most evident when he missed his first two free throws just moments after stepping onto the floor. But he picked up the slack in the second half and was able to finish in double figures with 10 points on 3-8 shooting. Young was just 1-5 from 3-point land, but had several unlucky bounces off the iron.

OTHER REASONS YOU SHOULD HAVE CARED ABOUT MONDAY’S GAME

Evan Turner shined while playing multiple positions.

In the absence of Rajon Rondo and Jeff Green, Turner was exactly what the Celtics needed to fill both roles. Turner started the game at small forward and started the second half at point guard for Brad Stevens, yet was the C’s best player regardless of position. Turner flirted with a triple-double in his 31 minutes, posting 15 points and 10 rebounds to go along with six assists.

Jared Sullinger still is a rebounding machine.

Sullinger got the start at power forward and was his usual self in terms of crashing the glass. Like much of the team, Sullinger did not shoot the ball well (4-15 FGs) but he still found ways to be effective. Sullinger ripped down 13 boards and still managed to score 10 points.

There still are some veterans who can score.

Not many people came into this season excited about Brandon Bass or Marcus Thornton, but they can both still fill it up. Bass finished with 15 points and nine rebounds in just over 19 minutes of action, while Thornton scored 14 in only 14 minutes off the bench. Bass and Thornton don’t figure to be a big part of the future in Boston, but with both of their contracts expiring at season’s end, their strong play makes them both viable trade candidates.

The Celtics will take on the Knicks in Hartford on Wednesday night.

Read More: Evan Turner, James Young, Marcus Smart,
Celtics open training camp, Brad Stevens ready for more aggressive approach 09.30.14 at 7:04 pm ET
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The Celtics kicked off training camp Tuesday with two-a-days at the team’€™s training facility in Waltham. It’€™s somewhat of a new trend for the team, which has journeyed to Newport, Rhode Island, for training camp the last several years.

Brad Stevens had a simple state of mind as to why the team is staying local.

“Because my office is here,” he said. “The computer is there, the TV I know how to work is in the same place. The equipment guys don’€™t have to carry thousands of bags. The video guys don’€™t have to move their whole life. It made a lot more sense to stay here. … The kind of work we get done is a lot more important than anything else, like where we do it.”

Stevens indicated he may have moved things along a bit too slowly last season and wants to take a more aggressive approach this time around.

“I’ve got a great idea about how fast or how slow I need to go,” he said. “Right now, in a lot of ways I’€™m trying to throw as much at them as possible in the next three days and then we’€™ll break it down after that.”

Added Stevens: “I thought I was too gradual last year and so we’€™re going to be a lot quicker in that. But at the same time, at the appropriate time, after a couple of days we’€™ll stop and hopefully break it down.”

With Rajon Rondo out of camp with a broken hand, Stevens briefly explained the team’s point guard situation on the first day of camp: “We had three teams, Evan [Turner], Marcus [Smart] and Phil [Pressey].”

Turner is less of a true point guard than Smart and Pressey, but that doesn’t concern Stevens.

“One thing is you don’€™t really know [is how Turner will respond], but he’€™s better with the ball than not,” Stevens said, adding: “Not withstanding Rondo, he’€™s as good of a pick-and-roll player as we have.”

Continued Stevens: “We have one point guard healthy that has NBA experience and that’€™s Phil Pressey. And that’€™s not a lot of it. I’€™m not as worried about [the point guard position] because I think people are going to put you in a box for your position, and I’€™m just not going to do that. I’€™m not going to worry about it. [Turner'€™s] a ball handler, he can make plays, he’€™s smart. And then I think that keeps our other guys in the positions that they’€™re most comfortable.”

The Celtics continue camp in Waltham all week before hosting a practice at the TD Garden on Friday for season ticket-holders.

Follow Julian Edlow on Twitter @julianedlow

Read More: Brad Stevens, Evan Turner, Marcus Smart, Phil Pressey
Rebuild Spotlight: What to expect from Marcus Smart, James Young 09.26.14 at 10:39 pm ET
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The Celtics are coming off of their worst season since 2006-07. Despite high expectations this offseason, the team is entering 2014-15 with a similar roster to last season, which comes with similar expectations. However, Brad Stevens will be in his second season as coach, Rajon Rondo will begin the season healthy should play most of the season and Danny Ainge has added some new, young talent. But it’€™s still clear that the Celtics are entering yet another rebuilding season, leaving us with some major questions. We’€™ll try to find some answers in this five-part series called Rebuild Spotlight.

Marcus Smart

Marcus Smart

When a team has a season like the 2013-14 Celtics did, much of the conversation amongst fans shifts from the play on the court to the potential that the future holds. We’€™re all guilty of it. Talking about who Boston’€™s next star could be is just more appealing than discussing why the C’€™s couldn’t get it done that game, again.

The problem is, those hopes and dreams rarely come true, as was the case this offseason. It started with the idea of winning the draft lottery, which would allow the Celtics to get their hands on either of the top prospects — Andrew Wiggins or Jabari Parker. When that didn’t happen, the focus moved to trading for a star like Kevin Love. What actually happened wasn’t the flashiest move, but Ainge made the most of his opportunity selecting at No. 6 and 17 overall.

Many believe the Celtics selected the best available player with both of their first-round picks — Marcus Smart and James Young. The rookies came to the Celtics with completely different expectations for the upcoming season, but both figure to play huge roles Boston’€™s long-term success.

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Read More: James Young, Marcus Smart,
Asset Management: Marcus Smart’s Celtics future 09.17.14 at 11:17 am ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Marcus Smart.

Marcus Smart

Marcus Smart

We can’t blame Smart for the Celtics landing the sixth overall overall pick in the 2014 NBA draft. It would’ve be nice to score Joel Embiid and Dario Saric, as the 76ers did, or Aaron Gordon and Elfrid Payton, as the Magic did. But the Celtics had the sixth and 17th picks — not third and 12th or fourth and 10th — so they’re banking on Smart and James Young being the best available talents at those slots, and so far at least we have no reason to believe otherwise.

The more we hear about Smart, the better fit he seems in Boston. He’s a defensive bulldog on the court, a likable character off it and a leader in both arenas, all traits the Celtics have sorely lacked since Kevin Garnett‘s departure.

If nothing else, Smart completes quite the defensive triumvirate in the backcourt. With him and Avery Bradley each capable of hounding the ball-handler, Rajon Rondo is free to gamble while defending the NBA’s dearth of off-guards — or, better yet, Smart and Bradley annoy the hell out of everyone, and they all rub off on Marcus Thornton — providing the Celtics a puncher’s chance on that end of the floor, despite the absence of a paint-protecting frontcourt.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, Marcus Smart, NBA
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