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Why you should care about Thursday’s Celtics win: Starting lineup dominates, especially Kelly Olynyk 10.16.14 at 9:33 pm ET
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Kelly Olynyk

Kelly Olynyk

Nothing like a preseason game against the 76ers to feel good about the Celtics. In a collective effort, they raced to a double-digit lead in the first five minutes, and never looked back in a 111-91 victory over the tank-tastic Sixers.

The starting lineup of Evan Turner, Avery Bradley, Jeff Green, Jared Sullinger and Kelly Olynyk obliterated Philadelphia, bringing the C’s (3-3) back to .500 in exhibiton. Turner contributed six points, five rebounds and 10 assists (albeit against eight turnovers). Bradley dropped 20 points on 6-of-9 shooting from 3-point range. Green added 18, even if it took him 15 shots to get there. Sullinger collected 21 points (8-10 FG), eight rebounds and five assists. And Olynyk amassed 14 points, eight rebounds, four assists, three steals and three blocks.

OTHER REASONS TO CARE AOBUT CELTICS-RAPTORS:

— Off the bench, Zeller followed up Wednesday’s impressive performance against the Raptors with 14 points and seven boards in 23 minutes.

— Marcus Smart’s shooting woes continued, as the rookie point guard finished scoreless on 0-for-4 shooting from distance in 28 minutes. He recorded six assists against four turnovers. As is his custom, though, Smart still managed to make an impact defensively, snatching three steals.

— Local products Michael Carter-Williams and Nerlens Noel did not play in the game, so, again, temper your excitement over a third 20-point victory of the Celtics preseason.

Read More: Boston Celtics, NBA, Philadelphia 76ers,
Asset Management: Evan Turner’s Celtics future 10.15.14 at 6:08 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Evan Turner.

Evan Turner isn’t this good.

At least, he hasn’t been, not at the NBA level. Through four preseason games with the Celtics, though, Turner is producing at a level we haven’t seen since his Ohio State days, and there’s reason to believe he can maintain that success.

His performance on the 76ers and briefly the Pacers hasn’t proved worthy of the No. 2 pick in 2010. The averages of 13.7 points, 5.7 rebounds and 3.8 assists from 2011-13 aren’t so bad, but he’s never posted a true shooting percentage better than 50 percent and submitted a PER (12.4) worse than the C’s top seven rotation players last season. Likewise, his assist-to-turnover ratio (1.39) ranked among the league’s worst for guards who dominated the ball as much as he did in 2013-14. By few measures has Turner been a productive basketball player.

All of which seems strange for a 6-foot-7, 205-pound consensus collegiate player of the year who was considered by DraftExpress “a dynamic shot-creator” and “one of the best perimeter stoppers in the draft” after three seasons on the Buckeyes. What happened to the guy who ranked among the 10 most efficient college players in 2009-10?

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, Evan Turner, NBA
Is Celtics’ Marcus Smart really this bad a shooter? 10.13.14 at 1:48 pm ET
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Marcus Smart

Marcus Smart

If you’re one of the many folks still ripping Rajon Rondo and Avery Bradley‘s perimeter shooting, wait until you get a load of Celtics rookie Marcus Smart.

Following a trend that’s been in decline since his days at appropriately named Marcus High in Flower Mound, Texas, Smart is attempting a higher rate of his shots from distance, even as his 3-point percentage progressively worsens.

Let’s take a look at Smart’s shooting percentages from inside the 3-point line — where he’s an exceptional finisher at the rim and gets to the free throw line with tremendous effectiveness — and beyond it since his junior year of high school.

2010-11 (high school junior): 176-292 2P (.603), 29-84 3P (.345)
2011-12 (high school senior): 143-216 2P (.577), 41-110 3P (.372)
2012-13 (Oklahoma State freshman): 113-243 2P (.465), 38-131 3P (.290)
2013-14 (Oklahoma State sophomore): 114-222 2P (.514), 49-164 3P (.299)
2014-15 (summer league/preseason): 14-41 2P (.342), 13-56 3P (.232)

At the prep level, Smart could get to the rim with ease, but his 6-foot-4, 226-pound frame becomes less of an advantage as the competition level rises. Likewise, scouting plays an increased role at each stage, and defenses are designed to encourage Smart’s shooting while discouraging his penetration.

As a result, the Celtics rookie’s long-distance attempts have increased from 27.6 percent of his total shots in high school to 38.8 percent in college and now 57.7 percent in nine games of summer league and preseason action. Granted, that’s a limited sample size in the NBA — where the 3-point distance is greater and he may be attempting more exhibition 3’s to adjust — but Smart’s excessive poor 3-point shooting remains a concern.

As usual, DraftExpress did a nice job of breaking down Smart’s catch-and-shoot struggles at Oklahoma State, where he was just as bad — if not worse — from mid-range as he was from 3, per shotanalytics.com.

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Read More: Boston Celtics, Marcus Smart, NBA,
Asset Management: James Young’s Celtics future 10.10.14 at 6:01 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: James Young.

James Young

James Young

Young’s received an awful lot of praise before he’s played a regular-season NBA game. It’s curious how analysts already determined he’s the next Paul Pierce, Ray Allen or Bradley Beal, or why Comcast commentators questioned Avery Bradley‘s signing since Young is so clearly the starting shooting guard in waiting.

It’s a wonder he slipped to No. 17 in the draft. Maybe all they needed to see was his 20-point performance in the national title game, since a season-long look at Young’s Kentucky production reveals a worse true shooting percentage (53.6) than Marcus Smart (55.2), the other Celtics rookie whose stroke has been roundly criticized. Or maybe Young’s 3-for-8 effort in his preseason debut was enough to anoint him, since he missed all of Summer League with a concussion.

Truth is, James Young is a project. At the end of the 19-year-old’s assignment, we may look back on him as a steal. But odds are Danny Ainge didn’t find the next great Celtic in the latter half of the first round, especially since the C’s president has long stated that fewer stars existed in the 2014 draft than most believed.

Still, the early returns on Young are encouraging, at least from his coach’s perspective.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, James Young, NBA
Asset Management: Marcus Thornton’s Celtics future 10.08.14 at 12:38 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Marcus Thornton.

Marcus Thornton

Marcus Thornton

The second-round pick that later became Marcus Thornton was traded for a dude named Stanko Barac when “Li’l Buckets” was still a Kilgore College sophomore, and thus his well traveled NBA road was paved before it even started.

Dealt again on draft day for a pair of future second-round picks, the LSU transfer immediately launched an assault on a list of doubters that’s weirdly evergrowing for a player whose NBA potential as a volume scorer was rather accurately assessed by DraftExpress from the start. In his only full season on the Hornets, Thornton averaged 14.5 points on 55.0 percent true shooting in 25.6 minutes a night alongside point guards Chris Paul and fellow rookie Darren Collison.

Traded in season twice — from New Orleans to Sacramento for Carl Landry in 2011 and from the Kings to the Brooklyn Nets for Jason Terry and Reggie Evans last season — Thornton has been consistently productive ever since. The 6-foot-4, 205-pound shooting guard has averaged between 17.3 and 20.3 points per 36 minutes and produced a PER between 14.0 and 18.2 each step of the way — save for a 46-game stretch in Mike Malone’s system to start last season.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, Marcus Thornton, NBA
Asset Management: Jared Sullinger’s Celtics future 10.02.14 at 1:22 pm ET
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I think we can all agree the Celtics won’€™t be raising banner 18 in the immediate future, and more likely than not the 2014-15 NBA season will result in another lottery pick come June, regardless of how ardently Rajon RondoAvery Bradley & Co. argue the contrary. It’€™s been a year since Danny Ainge traded Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett to the Nets, launching the process of stockpiling draft picks and cap-friendly contracts. Since the Celtics failed to cash in those commodities in exchange for fireworks this summer, this season’€™s preview will have a Wyc Grousbeck theme, focusing on the hodgepodge of C’€™s pieces in a series we’€™ll call Asset Management. Next up: Jared Sullinger.

Jared Sullinger

Jared Sullinger

Sullinger’s No. 1 goal this summer was to work himself into better shape, an objective both Celtics president Danny Ainge and coach Brad Stevens publicly supported, and then he showed up to training camp looking an awful lot like the guy who finished last season in need of improved conditioning.

“I’m not where I want to be, but really, really close,” said Sullinger. “Getting up and down in practice has really been helpful. Especially because of the pace that we’re playing, there’s no choice but for me to get in shape.

“So, as long as practices stay like this — and with the competition we have with Brandon [Bass] and Tyler [Zeller] and Erik Murphy and Dwight [Powell] and Kelly [Olynyk] — you have no choice but to play as hard as you can.”

That competition could further cut into his minutes, especially since Stevens has adopted the annual league-wide preseason mantra of pushing the pace and has other frontcourt contributors on the roster more suited to do so. After Wednesday’s practice, Stevens said of Olynyk, “I think our best bet is to make him a big part of what we’re doing,” and then added of Zeller, “He runs hard to the rim. … I think we’ll see a lot of that this year” — both of which could mean more time on the bench for Sullinger this season.

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Read More: Asset Management, Boston Celtics, Jared Sullinger, NBA
Celtics rookie James Young ‘definitely’ doesn’t see himself going to D-League 09.30.14 at 12:33 pm ET
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Celtics rookie James Young knows he has a lot to learn in his first season, but he’d rather his classroom be the bench in Boston than the court in Portland, Maine. When asked if he’d welcome the possibility of playing 30 minutes a game for the Maine Red Claws — the C’s NBA Developmental League affiliate — Young was less than enthused.

“Definitely not,” Young said from the Celtics media day in Waltham on Monday, adding, “If it happens, it happens, but I just want to stay here and get better like that.”

While Maine may not be the most tantalizing of destinations for the first-round pick from Kentucky, it may be he best opportunity to develop his skills. Young is only 19 years old, and given the number of swingmen the Celtics have on the roster, it’€™s difficult to imagine him getting a lot of playing time early in the season.

Young will look to impress coaches during training camp and preseason, but if he’s unable to prove that he’s NBA ready, it’€™s likely he’ll quickly become familiar with America’€™s Vacationland.

Read More: Boston Celtics, James Young, NBA,
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